Archive for tag: Canada

Archive pour tag : Canada

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Hope high that court will overturn refugee ruling

A refugee rests in a tent set up by the Canadian Armed Forces near the U.S.-Canadian border in Lacolle, Quebec

It will likely be months before refugee advocates, including the Canadian Council of Churches, know whether they have prevailed at the Supreme Court. But for now, council general secretary Rev. Peter Noteboom is satisfied that the argument to strike down the Safe Third Country Agreement between the United States and Canada has been heard.
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Posted: Oct. 13, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12597
Categories: The Catholic RegisterIn this article: Canada, Canadian Council of Churches, refugees
Transmis : 13 oct. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12597
Catégorie : The Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Canada, Canadian Council of Churches, refugees


Safe Third Country Agreement before Supreme Court

A gavel and a block are pictured on a judge's bench in this illustration picture

As Canada’s Safe Third Country Agreement with the United States goes back before the Supreme Court of Canada Oct. 6, Ottawa has revealed a surge of 23,358 asylum seekers at irregular border crossings in the first eight months of 2022.

That’s 13-per-cent more than all of 2017, when the flood of refugees at Quebec’s Roxham Road crossing from New York captured headlines.
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Posted: Oct. 9, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12622
Categories: The Catholic RegisterIn this article: Canada, Canadian Council of Churches, migration, refugees, safe third-country agreement, Supreme Court
Transmis : 9 oct. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12622
Catégorie : The Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Canada, Canadian Council of Churches, migration, refugees, safe third-country agreement, Supreme Court


KAIROS soutient les projets de loi pour mettre fin au racisme environnemental et responsabiliser les entreprises

Depuis des décennies, les industries polluantes et les sites d’enfouissement se sont retrouvés dans des communautés autochtones, noires, et autres communautés racisées au Canada, les laissant aux prises avec des taux anormalement élevés de cancers, de maladies respiratoires et d’autres problèmes de santé chroniques. Ces zones sacrifiées s’étendent aussi aux communautés des pays du Sud – souvent pauvres, souvent autochtones  –  où opèrent les compagnies minières canadiennes, et où elles contaminent les sources d’eau et contribuent à des violations des droits humains, largement documentées

La crise climatique et la dégradation environnementale affectent des communautés partout sur la planète, mais certaines communautés le sont plus que d’autres.

Depuis des décennies, les industries polluantes et les sites d’enfouissement se sont retrouvés dans des communautés autochtones, noires, et autres communautés racisées au Canada, les laissant aux prises avec des taux anormalement élevés de cancers, de maladies respiratoires et d’autres problèmes de santé chroniques.
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Posted: Sept. 13, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12644
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: Canada, Canadian mining, corporate accountability, environmental racism, KAIROS
Transmis : 13 sept. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12644
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : Canada, Canadian mining, corporate accountability, environmental racism, KAIROS


KAIROS supports bills to end environmental racism and make corporations accountable

For decades, polluting industries and landfill sites have ended up in Indigenous, Black, Brown and other racialized communities in Canada, burdening these communities with higher-than-normal rates of cancer, respiratory illnesses, and other chronic health problems. These sacrifice zones extend to communities in the Global South – usually poor and often Indigenous – where Canadian mining companies operate, contaminating fresh water sources, and contributing to well-documented human rights violations

The climate crisis and environmental degradation are taking their toll on communities worldwide. But some communities are impacted more than others.

For decades, polluting industries and landfill sites have ended up in Indigenous, Black, Brown and other racialized communities in Canada, burdening these communities with higher-than-normal rates of cancer, respiratory illnesses, and other chronic health problems.
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Posted: Sept. 13, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12641
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: Canada, Canadian mining, corporate accountability, environmental racism, KAIROS
Transmis : 13 sept. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12641
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : Canada, Canadian mining, corporate accountability, environmental racism, KAIROS


Papal visit a chance to engage in ‘genuine relationship’ for better future

Kevin Scott, a First Nations dancer, performs for Pope Francis in the Vatican's Clementine Hall

When busloads of residential school survivors, elders, knowledge keepers and youth descend on Edmonton and Quebec City to be present as Pope Francis walks on his “penitential pilgrimage,” Cynthia Bunn will be among them. But she didn’t want to be.

The third-generation residential school survivor from Sagkeen First Nation had to be persuaded by St. Boniface Archbishop Albert LeGatt. A member of the parish council at St. Alexander Church, Bunn initially agreed only to co-ordinate Sagkeen’s contribution to the 56 survivors, knowledge keepers and their care-givers from seven First Nations going from St. Boniface to Edmonton. But the archbishop dropped in on Bunn to plead with her.

“But you’re the co-ordinator. I need you there,” Bunn recalled LeGatt saying. “So I reluctantly decided to go.”
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Posted: July 22, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12300
Categories: The Catholic RegisterIn this article: Canada, Indigenous peoples, papal visit, Pope Francis, Reconciliation
Transmis : 22 juil. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12300
Catégorie : The Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Canada, Indigenous peoples, papal visit, Pope Francis, Reconciliation


Why is the Pope Going to Canada?

The Assembly of First Nations delegation visits with Pope Francis

In the days between March 28 and April 1 of this year, a delegation of representatives of the Indigenous peoples of Canada traveled to Rome with some of their bishops for several meetings with Pope Francis. He promised to travel personally to Canada later this summer to continue the dialogue in their “Indigenous territories.”

During the concluding meeting, the pope said, “it is my hope that our meetings during these days will point out new paths to be pursued together, will instill courage and strength, and lead to greater commitment on the local level. Any truly effective process of healing requires concrete actions. In a fraternal spirit, I encourage the Bishops and the Catholic community to continue taking steps toward the transparent search for truth and to foster healing and reconciliation. These steps are part of a journey that can favor the rediscovery and revitalization of your culture, while helping the Church to grow in love, respect and specific attention to your authentic traditions. I wish to tell you that the Church stands beside you and wants to continue journeying with you. Dialogue is the key to knowledge and sharing, and the Bishops of Canada have clearly stated their commitment to continue advancing together with you on a renewed, constructive, fruitful path, where encounters and shared projects will be of great help.”[1]

In these pages we will attempt to briefly outline the context of the journey of truth and reconciliation with the Indigenous peoples of Canada, in which the pope is intensely engaged, alongside the Canadian Church.
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Posted: July 19, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12255
Categories: News, OpinionIn this article: apologies, Canada, Indigenous peoples, papal visit, Pope Francis, Reconciliation
Transmis : 19 juil. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12255
Catégorie : News, OpinionDans cet article : apologies, Canada, Indigenous peoples, papal visit, Pope Francis, Reconciliation


Pope describes Canada trip as ‘penitential pilgrimage’

Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service
Pope Francis addresses the crown in St. Peter's Square after the Angelus

Asking for prayers ahead of his visit to Canada July 24-29, Pope Francis described the trip as a “penitential pilgrimage” as part of a commitment to healing and reconciliation with the country’s Indigenous people.

“Unfortunately, in Canada, many Christians, including some members of religious institutes, contributed to the policies of cultural assimilation that, in the past, have severely harmed native communities in various ways,” the pope said July 17, referring particularly to the involvement of dioceses and religious orders in running residential schools.

From the 1870s to the 1990s, the Canadian government, usually in partnership with Christian churches, operated a residential school system to which over 150,000 First Nation, Métis and Inuit students were sent. Their language and customs were banned, and they often suffered malnourishment and physical, emotional and sexual abuse.
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Posted: July 18, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12266
Categories: CNSIn this article: Canada, Indigenous peoples, papal visit, Pope Francis, Reconciliation
Transmis : 18 juil. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12266
Catégorie : CNSDans cet article : Canada, Indigenous peoples, papal visit, Pope Francis, Reconciliation


Prostitution report slammed

Terry O’Neill, Canadian Catholic News
A protest at Vancouver City Hall over the lack of enforcement of prostitution legislation

Parliament’s Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights is being blasted by anti-prostitution groups in Canada after releasing a report that concludes Canada’s current anti-prostitution law does more harm than good.

Although the justice committee report released June 22 stops short of calling for the 2014 law’s immediate repeal, it embraces the “sex-positive” and “harm-reduction” language of sex-industry activists who want to fully decriminalize prostitution. For example, the report describes prostituted persons as “sex workers” and terms prostitution an “industry.”

The committee’s report, titled Preventing Harm in the Canadian Sex Industry: A Review of the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, capped its statutory review of the current anti-prostitution law enacted under the previous Conservative government.

The law frames prostitution as a form of violence against women and youth and criminalizes both those who purchase commercialized sexual services and those who profit from it. The law gives prostituted persons immunity from prosecution and encourages them to exit prostitution.
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Posted: July 7, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=12023
Categories: The Catholic RegisterIn this article: Canada, human trafficking
Transmis : 7 juil. 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=12023
Catégorie : The Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Canada, human trafficking


Pope Francis postpones African trip, no word on Canadian journey

Catholic Register
Pope Francis grimaces in pain as he gets up from his chair during the general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican in this April 20, 2022, file photo. On his doctors' advice because of ongoing problems with his knee, the pope will not travel to Congo and South Sudan in early July, the Vatican announced

The Vatican’s press office announced today that because of continuing problems with his knee, the Pope has postponed his planned African trip scheduled for July 2-7.

Pope Francis is scheduled to visit Canada July 24-29. Matteo Bruni, director of the Vatican Press Office, did not mention whether that trip is still set. Either way, plans are still being made for papal visit to Canada.

“At this time, we continue to move forward with our planning,” said Neil MacCarthy, Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops communications lead on the papal trip.

Among the plans is ensuring plenty of rest for the Pope.

“Great care is being taken to provide significant periods of rest for the Holy Father,” he said. “And also to ensure his participation at events is for a limited period of time.”

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Posted: June 10, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=11741
Categories: The Catholic RegisterIn this article: Canada, Pope Francis
Transmis : 10 juin 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=11741
Catégorie : The Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Canada, Pope Francis


Canada’s assisted suicide law undercuts palliative care, experts say

Terry O'Neill, for The B.C. Catholic, Vancouver
A dying cancer patient holds a stuffed animal during her final hours at a palliative care hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 24, 2010

Evidence is mounting that assisted suicide’s introduction into the Canadian medical system is not only undermining governments’ oft-stated plans to improve palliative care but is actively damaging the country’s already inadequate palliative care system. Some patients are choosing to die rather than to continue to live without adequate palliative care.

Dr. Neil Hilliard, a palliative care expert from Abbotsford, British Columbia, said health facilities’ introduction of assisted suicide into palliative care wards and hospices, following legalization of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD) in June 2016, has led to a reduction in true palliative cares services.

“It’s like a cancer growing within the palliative care programs,” said Hilliard who, in 2017, resigned as medical director of the Fraser Health Authority’s palliative care program because of his opposition to the authority’s insistence that he support the performing of assisted suicide in hospices.

“(MAiD) is starting to take over to a certain degree. But still only 5% of people are choosing MAiD; 95% would prefer to live well until they die naturally.”
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Posted: May 21, 2022 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=11262
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, euthanasia, palliative care, physician assisted suicide
Transmis : 21 mai 2022 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=11262
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, euthanasia, palliative care, physician assisted suicide


Safe third country appeal heading to Supreme Court

Michael Swan, The Catholic Register
A woman who told police that she and her family were from Sudan is taken into custody by a Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer after arriving Feb.12 by taxi and walking across the U.S.-Canada border into Quebec

The Canadian Council of Churches, Amnesty International and the Canadian Council for Refugees are headed to the Supreme Court of Canada on behalf of refugee families who want a legal way to apply for asylum at Canada’s land borders. After twice winning in Federal Court only to see those decisions reversed in the Federal Court of Appeal, this is the first time the Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments about the constitutional validity of Canada’s Safe Third Country Agreement (STCA) with the United States. Under the agreement, persons seeking refugee status must make their claim in the first country in which they arrive. It has been in place since 2004. A definitive ruling is necessary to clarify a system that forces would-be refugees to cross into Canada illegally at unofficial border crossings like Roxham Road south of Montreal at the Quebec-New York border, said Detroit Mercy University law professor Alex Vernon.

“Most refugees’ first experience of Canada is either to be summarily denied protection and excluded if they go to a (legal) port of entry without an exception to the STCA or to be forced to be ‘law breakers’ and arrested and processed upon entry at Roxham Road,” said Vernon, who runs Detroit Mercy’s immigration law clinic and regularly takes students to Roxham Road for real life experience of practising law on the border. “This is not in keeping with Canada’s international obligations, with constitutional rights of people on Canadian soil, nor with the dignity due to human beings — particularly human beings in distress.” The latest court loss for the refugee advocates at the CCC, AI and CCR came in April. The appeal court’s decision was based “not on substantive grounds, but on the basis of how the arguments were framed,” said a press release from the Canadian Council for Refugees.
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Posted: Dec. 17, 2021 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=10927
Categories: The Catholic RegisterIn this article: Canada, Canadian Council of Churches, refugees
Transmis : 17 déc. 2021 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=10927
Catégorie : The Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Canada, Canadian Council of Churches, refugees


Church leaders sign statement of support for Wet’suwet’en

Protest participants at Unist'ot'en Camp honour missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as police move towards the camp

A statement calling on the government of Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to “immediately cease their occupation, arrests, and trespassing on Wet’suwet’en sovereign territory” has drawn signatures from 71 church leaders in in the Anglican Church of Canada and beyond.

The statement of solidarity with Wet’suwet’en Nation pipeline opposition was released by Toronto Urban Native Ministry in the diocese of Toronto. Posted Feb. 6, it was signed by several Anglican bishops, including National Indigenous Anglican Archbishop Mark MacDonald and National Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada Susan Johnson. Many more signatures have since been added via the web.

The statement notes the unanimous opposition of the Wet’suwet’en Clan Chiefs to the construction of the pipeline. It says that the “militarized forced removal of the Wet’suwet’an from their own territory” is in violation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP) and is “consistent with the colonial practices of genocide,” and that the RCMP “does not hold the jurisdiction or right to arrest sovereign Wet’suwet’en peoples on their own unceded Nation and territory.”
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Posted: Feb. 18, 2020 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=10715
Categories: Anglican JournalIn this article: Canada, Indigenous peoples, Reconciliation
Transmis : 18 févr. 2020 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=10715
Catégorie : Anglican JournalDans cet article : Canada, Indigenous peoples, Reconciliation


Cannabis use for fun ‘sinful behaviour,’ B.C. and Yukon bishops tell Catholics

Catholic bishops in British Columbia and Yukon have endorsed medical marijuana use, but condemned recreational pot smoking as contrary to the teachings of the church.

In a letter posted online in late November, the bishops — six from B.C. and one from Whitehorse — warn that “the mere fact that an activity is made legal by the government does not automatically mean that it is morally acceptable.” Recreational cannabis became legal in Canada on Oct. 17, one of the signature accomplishments of Justin Trudeau’s government.

But the letter from all six B.C. bishops and the one Yukon bishop distinguishes between therapeutic uses, such as controlling for pain and nausea, and toking for fun. In the former, the letter states, impairment “can be accepted as a foreseen but unintended secondary effect of the drug’s beneficial use.” Medical cannabis has been legal in Canada for nearly two decades.
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Posted: Dec. 5, 2018 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=10318
Categories: NewsIn this article: bishops, Canada, cannabis, Catholic
Transmis : 5 déc. 2018 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=10318
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : bishops, Canada, cannabis, Catholic


Interfaith letter to Minister of Justice concerning clause 14 of Bill C-51

Most Reverend Lionel Gendron, P.S.S., Bishop of Saint-Jean-Longueuil and President of the CCCB and Mr. Bruce F. Simpson, a partner specializing in criminal law with Barnes Sammon LLP

Over 60 faith leaders and organizations in Canada have signed a letter addressed to The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, concerning the removal of section 176 from the Criminal Code of Canada, as proposed under Clause 14 of Bill C-51, “An Act to Amend the Criminal Code and the Department of Justice Act and to Make Consequential Amendments to Another Act”. The interfaith letter was co-authored by the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB), The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, and the Association for Reformed Political Action. Representatives from a variety of faith traditions have endorsed the letter, including from the Sikh, Jewish, Muslim, Catholic, Orthodox, Protestant, and Buddhist traditions.

The Conference also intervened on 30 October 2017 concerning Clause 14 of Bill C-51, which included a written submission to the House of Commons’ Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, followed by oral presentations before the Standing Committee by the Most Reverend Lionel Gendron, P.S.S., Bishop of Saint-Jean-Longueuil and President of the CCCB and His Eminence Thomas Cardinal Collins, Archbishop of Toronto, with the assistance of Mr. Bruce F. Simpson, a partner specialized in criminal law with Barnes Sammon LLP.
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Posted: Nov. 7, 2017 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9803
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, criminal justice, interfaith, religious freedom
Transmis : 7 nov. 2017 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9803
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, criminal justice, interfaith, religious freedom


Supreme Court of Canada Clarifies Scope of Religious Freedom

Evangelical Fellowship of Canada

Yesterday, the Supreme Court of Canada reaffirmed that government actors have a duty to specifically consider religious freedom concerns when raised by claimants in its Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia decision. This historic case – the first Indigenous religious freedom claim to be heard by the Supreme Court – raised questions about the scope of religious freedom, and the means by which religious communities can practise and manifest their faith. Christian Legal Fellowship (CLF) and The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada (EFC) jointly intervened in the case.

The litigation arose from a proposed ski resort on land that is sacred to the Ktunaxa people. The Ktunaxa Nation opposed the development on the basis that it would desecrate the sacred site and would interfere with a variety of their spiritual practices.

The British Columbia Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources approved the development but did not specifically address how the decision would impact the Ktunaxa Nation’s section 2(a) Charter right to freedom of religion.

The Supreme Court upheld the Minister’s ultimate decision; however, the Court was divided 7-2 on some of their underlying reasons.
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Posted: Nov. 3, 2017 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9777
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, Indigenous peoples, religious freedom, Supreme Court
Transmis : 3 nov. 2017 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9777
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, Indigenous peoples, religious freedom, Supreme Court


Canadian theologian Gregory Baum dead at 94

Canadian theologian Gregory Baum

One of Canada’s most influential and controversial theologians, among the few remaining living links to the Second Vatican Council, has died.

Gregory Baum, author of the first draft of Nostra Aetate, was 94 years old.

Baum was admitted to St. Mary’s Hospital in Montreal Oct. 8. “I’m disappearing inside,” he told a friend. He decided not to continue the dialysis treatment which had kept him alive the last four years.

As a young theologian, Baum shot to prominence in the early days of the Second Vatican Council, mentored by Cardinal Augustin Bea. A key ally of Pope St. John XXIII, Bea looked for credible Catholic experts on Catholic-Jewish relations and found his man in Baum.
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Posted: Oct. 19, 2017 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9773
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, Gregory Baum, Jewish-Christian relations, Québec, theologian
Transmis : 19 oct. 2017 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9773
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, Gregory Baum, Jewish-Christian relations, Québec, theologian


Bishops offer pastoral guidelines for when Canadians seek assisted suicide

A demonstrator against assisted suicide joins a protest outside the Houses of Parliament in London, England last September

The bishops of Alberta and the Northwest Territories have issued pastoral guidelines for clergy dealing with Catholics who are considering euthanasia or assisted suicide, which is now legal in Canada.

The 32-page document, written for priests and parishes, gives guidance on when people in such situations are eligible to receive certain sacraments or a Catholic funeral. It includes references to canon law and pastoral guidance for special circumstances.

The document specifically addresses the sacraments of reconciliation and anointing of the sick.

“In our day a priest may encounter a penitent who has officially requested physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia,” the document says. “The penitent has not yet been killed, nor has he/she committed suicide, but he or she has initiated the process, which is already a grave matter.

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Posted: Sept. 20, 2016 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9568
Categories: CNSIn this article: Alberta, Canada, Catholic, euthanasia, pastoral care, physician assisted suicide
Transmis : 20 sept. 2016 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9568
Catégorie : CNSDans cet article : Alberta, Canada, Catholic, euthanasia, pastoral care, physician assisted suicide


Interfaith Representatives Call for Improved Palliative Care across Canada

At the National Press Gallery in Ottawa on June 14, Canadian interfaith leaders issued a joint call for improved palliative care

Today, representatives from various faith communities united to issue a joint call to Canada’s elected officials to support a robust, well-resourced, national palliative care strategy and to raise awareness of inadequacies in palliative care, particularly in the wake of the debate over Physician-Assisted Dying/Suicide.

In addition to issuing an Interfaith Statement on Palliative Care, the organizations reaffirmed that compassion is a foundational element of Canadian identity that should directly shape Canadian public policy when it comes to end-of-life issues. The spokespersons warned that assisted dying/suicide must not become a default choice for those struggling with terminal illnesses, and that it is a national imperative to enhance access to and the quality of palliative care.
“The need for quality, widely accessible palliative care should be one of the most pressing concerns of our country,” said the Most Reverend Noël Simard, Bishop of Valleyfield, on behalf of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops. “Faith communities, along with health care workers, have for centuries stood by the bedsides of the dying to comfort and protect, to heal and console. Today, as faith leaders, we recommit ourselves to this sacred task of providing the spiritual care so essential to palliative care.”
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Posted: June 14, 2016 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9600
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, euthanasia, interfaith, palliative care
Transmis : 14 juin 2016 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9600
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, euthanasia, interfaith, palliative care


Anglican-Catholic dialogue coming to Toronto

Saskatoon Roman Catholic Bishop Donald Bolen, left, and Anglican Bishop Linda Nicholls will be among those speaking on Anglican-Catholic dialogue in Toronto

One of the most important and troubled projects from the Second Vatican Council arrives in Toronto May 11 for some serious, scholarly, and saintly talk.

The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, better known as ARCIC, rolls into town to puzzle over how Catholics and Anglicans make decisions over ethical questions and to find new ways to sum up its work over the last five decades.

ARCIC is the official ecumenical dialogue between the world’s 85 million Anglicans and 1.3 billion Catholics set up by the Vatican and the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1969.

This is the first time ARCIC has met in Canada, and it gives Canada’s own Anglican-Catholic dialogue partners a chance to rub shoulders with their international counterparts.
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Posted: Apr. 29, 2016 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9055
Categories: Dialogue, The Catholic RegisterIn this article: Anglican, ARCIC, Canada, Catholic, dialogue
Transmis : 29 avril 2016 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9055
Catégorie : Dialogue, The Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Anglican, ARCIC, Canada, Catholic, dialogue


Aboriginal elder welcomes Canadian churches’ endorsement of UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Aboriginal elder, Doreen Spence, welcomes Canadian churches’ endorsement of UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Canadian church leaders issued a joint statement endorsing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP) and promising to implement its principles. Doreen Spence, an aboriginal Canadian who was one of the architects of the declaration, welcomes the move.

“Endorsement is a big step forward. I really commend them,” Spence says. “It has taken them a long time.”

Spence served as presiding elder to the core group of indigenous people who met in Geneva over a 20-year period to craft the declaration and guide it through the lengthy process that led to its adoption by the UN General Assembly in 2007. The World Council of Churches (WCC) supported the working group by offering meeting space at the Ecumenical Centre.

The Canadian churches’ statement, signed by seven church leaders, says they commit to implementing the principles, norms, and standards named in the UN declaration and “embrace the opportunity … to work for reconciliation and to fully respect the human rights and dignity of indigenous peoples in Canada.”

Canadian church leaders issued their endorsement on 30 March in response to a call-to-action by Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission into abuse of aboriginal students in church-run residential schools. In its report released in June 2015, the TRC called on churches, faith groups, and social justice groups in Canada to “formally adopt and comply with” the principles and standards of UNDRIP as a framework for reconciliation between the country’s aboriginal and non-aboriginal peoples.

Leaders of the Anglican Church of Canada, Christian Reformed Church, Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, Presbyterian Church in Canada, Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), Salvation Army, and United Church of Canada issued the statement in Ottawa, the country’s capital city. The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, and Holy Cross Fathers also issued statements, as did several ecumenical and interfaith groups.
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Posted: Apr. 19, 2016 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9137
Categories: WCC NewsIn this article: Canada, church, declarations, Indigenous peoples, United Nations
Transmis : 19 avril 2016 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9137
Catégorie : WCC NewsDans cet article : Canada, church, declarations, Indigenous peoples, United Nations


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