Serving a Wounded World in Interreligious Solidarity

 — August 27, 202027 aoüt 2020

WCC, Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue release “Serving a Wounded World” document
WCC News

The World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue (PCID) have released a joint document, “Serving a Wounded World in Interreligious Solidarity: A Christian Call to Reflection and Action During COVID-19 and Beyond.” Its purpose is to encourage churches and Christian organizations to reflect on the importance of interreligious solidarity in a world wounded by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The document offers a Christian basis for interreligious solidarity that can inspire and confirm the impulse to serve a world wounded not only by COVID-19 but also by many other wounds.

The publication is also designed to be useful to practitioners of other religions, who have already responded to COVID-19 with similar thoughts based on their own traditions.

The document recognizes the current context of the pandemic as a time for discovering new forms of solidarity for rethinking the post-COVID-19 world. Comprised of five sections, the document reflects on the nature of a solidarity sustained by hope and offers a Christian basis for interreligious solidarity, a few key principles and a set of recommendations on how reflection on solidarity can be translated into concrete and credible action.

WCC interim general secretary Rev. Prof. Dr Ioan Sauca reflected that interreligious dialogue is vital to healing and caring for one another on a global level. “In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, the human family is facing together an unprecedented call to protect one another, and to heal our communities,” he said. “Interreligious dialogue not only helps clarify the principles of our own faith and our identity as Christians, but also opens our understanding of the challenges—and creative solutions—others may have.”

Cardinal Miguel Ángel Ayuso Guixot, president of the PCID, reflected that Christian service and solidarity in a wounded world have been part of agenda of the PCID and WCC since last year. The COVID-19 pandemic pressed the project into action as “a timely ecumenical and interreligious response,” he said, adding that “the pandemic has exposed the woundedness and fragility of our world, revealing that our responses must be offered in an inclusive solidarity, open to followers of other religious traditions and people of good will, given the concern for the entire human family.”

The document is the latest to be co-produced by the WCC and the PCID following the publication of “Education for Peace in a Multi-Religious World: A Christian Perspective” in May 2019.

Posted: August 27, 2020 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=10818
Categories: Documents, WCC NewsIn this article: interfaith, justice, Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, solidarity, WCC
Transmis : 27 aoüt 2020 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=10818
Catégorie : Documents, WCC NewsDans cet article : interfaith, justice, Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, solidarity, WCC

Members of the Trilateral Dialogue Commission at their meeting in February 2017. Photo: Wilhelm Unger

Remember your baptism: Trilateral dialogue report presents gifts and challenges

 — August 12, 202012 aoüt 2020

The final report on the Lutheran-Mennonite-Roman Catholic Trilateral Conversation has been published. The report summarizes five years of theological consultations between the three communions on the understanding and practice of baptism in light of contemporary pastoral and missional challenges facing all three Christian communities.

“The report shows that today these three churches agree that baptism is for discipleship,” says Mennonite delegation member Larry Miller. “It raises the question for each of these churches: are there ways of acknowledging our different practices of baptism that grow the unity for which Jesus prayed?”

Representatives of the Catholic Church (Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity), Lutheran World Federation (LWF), and Mennonite World Conference (MWC) met from 2012–2017 to discuss understanding and practice of baptism.
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Pope Francis baptizes a baby as he celebrates Mass on the feast of the Baptism of the Lord in the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican Jan. 12, 2020. Photo: CNS/Vatican Media

Vatican says baptisms that used a modified formula are not valid

 — August 6, 20206 aoüt 2020

Changing the words of the formula for baptism render the sacrament invalid, said the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. Specifically, a baptism administered with the formula “We baptize you …” instead of “I baptize you in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” is not valid because it is the person of Christ through the minister who is acting, not the assembly, the congregation said.

The doctrinal congregation’s ruling was published Aug. 6 as a brief response to questions regarding the validity of baptisms using that modified formula. The congregation was asked whether a baptism was valid if it had been performed with a formula that seeks to express the “communitarian significance” and participation of the family and those present during the celebration. For example, it said there have been celebrations administered with the words, “In the name of the father and of the mother, of the godfather and of the godmother, of the grandparents, of the family members, of the friends, in the name of the community we baptize you in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.”
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Video Conferencing Etiquette

 — March 16, 202016 mars 2020

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, churches across Canada are cancelling services, meetings, and other gatherings. Many are exploring options for live-streaming services and for video-conferencing of meetings. With this in mind, I have drafted these suggestions based on my own experience and some ideas I have found in the documents listed at the end.

The following tips are provided to enhance the effectiveness of video conference technology in church meetings. These suggestions are based on using Zoom, but many of them are applicable to other software as well, such as GoToMeeting or Skype.
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Bishops from around the world walk in procession from St. Peter’s Basilica at the start of the Synod of Bishops for the Amazon at the Vatican in this Oct. 7, 2019, file photo. Pope Francis has chosen the theme of “synodality” for the next synod in 2022. Photo: CNS/Paul Haring

Pope chooses ‘synodality’ as theme for 2022 synod

 — March 9, 20209 mars 2020

Pope Francis has decided the next world Synod of Bishops at the Vatican, which will take place in October 2022, will have the theme: “For a synodal church: Communion, participation and mission.”

The Vatican announced the choice of “synodality” as the theme in a brief communique March 7.

“Synodality,” which literally means “walking together,” has become a key topic of Pope Francis’ pontificate, but one which has raised questions and even confusion.

The basic idea in the pope’s teaching is that the grace of baptism makes one part of the body of the church and, therefore, responsible for its life and mission. In a hierarchical church, that shared responsibility calls for regular, serious and structural forums for listening to all members of the church. At the same time, as the pope has said, it does not mean putting decisions to a vote as if a synod were a parliament.
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Protest participants at Unist'ot'en Camp honour missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as police move towards the camp. Photo: Michael Toledano

Church leaders sign statement of support for Wet’suwet’en

 — February 18, 202018 février 2020

A statement calling on the government of Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to “immediately cease their occupation, arrests, and trespassing on Wet’suwet’en sovereign territory” has drawn signatures from 71 church leaders in in the Anglican Church of Canada and beyond.

The statement of solidarity with Wet’suwet’en Nation pipeline opposition was released by Toronto Urban Native Ministry in the diocese of Toronto. Posted Feb. 6, it was signed by several Anglican bishops, including National Indigenous Anglican Archbishop Mark MacDonald and National Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada Susan Johnson. Many more signatures have since been added via the web.

The statement notes the unanimous opposition of the Wet’suwet’en Clan Chiefs to the construction of the pipeline. It says that the “militarized forced removal of the Wet’suwet’an from their own territory” is in violation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP) and is “consistent with the colonial practices of genocide,” and that the RCMP “does not hold the jurisdiction or right to arrest sovereign Wet’suwet’en peoples on their own unceded Nation and territory.”
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The Revd Dr Will Adam with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. Photo: Lambeth Palace

Unity, Faith and Order

 — February 7, 20207 février 2020

The Department for Unity, Faith and Order in the Anglican Communion has at its core the search for deeper unity between Christians, be that within and between the churches of the Anglican Communion or between the Anglican Communion and other Christian churches and bodies.

Much of the work of Unity, Faith and Order (which goes by the extra-terrestrial acronym UFO) is taken up with encouraging Christians to talk together. Over the course of the last century much work has been done to break down mutual suspicion and division between churches by patient dialogue and the building up of relationships. This happens at the local level, where Christians find that when they come together to pray or get involved with mission and ministry that they have more in common than they first thought. It also happens at national and international level, when theologians from different churches and traditions talk together to come to agreement on issues that have previously divided them.
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A new Communion-wide Eucharistic liturgy prepared by the Task Group was used for the first time during a service for Primates on the shores of the River Jordan. Photo: Alex Baker/ACNS

Anglican Communion called to repent as primates affirm commitment to walk together

 — January 20, 202020 janvier 2020

The work of the Task Group which was established by the Archbishop of Canterbury after the January 2016 Primates’ Meeting has been commended by the Primates. The Task Group has called for a Season of Repentance, focused around the fifth Sunday in Lent this year (29 March), and has prepared a common Anglican Communion eucharistic liturgy and papers on Anglican identity.

In their communiqué, released at the end of last week’s Primates’ Meeting, the Primates explained that the Task Group was established “to look at how we might walk together despite the complexities we face.”

They added: “at this meeting we affirmed our continued commitment to walk together; we received the work of the Task Group and commended it to the other Instruments of Communion – the Lambeth Conference and the Anglican Consultative Council.”

They also recommended that a new group be established “to continue the work of the Task Group to explore how we live and work together in the light of the Lambeth Conference.
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Photo: Church of Ireland

A Joint Christmas 2019 Message from Archbishops Richard Clarke and Eamon Martin

 — December 19, 201919 décembre 2019

Together we wish you God’s richest blessings this Christmas and through the year ahead.

These few days at the turn of the year offer an opportunity for people who are normally very busy to give worthwhile time to family and friends. It can also be a stressful and difficult time for people who feel estranged from friends and loved ones to whom they were once close, and for those who feel they have no–one they can truly call a friend.

Over Christmas and New Year many people are able to rekindle relationships that have somehow gone sour. We are all capable of bringing light and love into another person’s life – perhaps someone for whom hope itself is fading, someone who desperately needs the rekindling of trust that only care and friendship can bring. Jesus Christ came into the world to bring us not only the light of his love but also the warmth of his friendship. Indeed, he assured his disciples that they were more than just “followers”; they were his “friends” (John 15.15).
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Peace and Goodwill to all Peoples: KAIROS Christmas video

 — December 18, 201918 décembre 2019

In days leading up to Christmas, I walked through the streets of Bethlehem with Palestinians for whom it is home.

In this place of present day occupation, where people struggle to live in dignity and peace, you can’t help but reflect on the meaning of the story of Christmas. How is the good news of so many, many years ago revealed in our day, whether in Bethlehem, Barrancabermeja or the Downtown Eastside?

The answer came to me through the children. The ones who played peek-a-boo with me from their mother’s laps when we visited the women’s groups. The ones who tugged at my sleeves in the markets asking me to buy trinkets. The ones who play in the shadow of the separation wall, or who walk through groups of soldiers with machine guns as if it was the most normal of things—because it is.
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