Archive for 2017

Archive pour 2017

  1     2  

Europe’s Catholic, Orthodox leaders say they’ll stand against terrorism

People kneel during a 2015 Paris Mass for the 129 victims of coordinated terrorists attacks. Photo: CNS/Paul HaringCatholic and Orthodox leaders have pledged to stand together against fundamentalism and terrorism, as well as resisting forces working to erode and destroy religious belief in Europe.

“Terrorist violence against people considered unbelievers or infidels is the extreme degree of religious intolerance — we unreservedly condemn it and deplore that such acts have developed in the soil of a misguided religious culture,” the church representatives said in a joint message Jan. 13.

“The constitutions of our states guarantee the fundamental rights of the human person. Nevertheless, in our societies, forces are always at work to marginalize or even erase religions and their message from the public space. We believe Europe needs more than ever the breath of faith in Christ and the hope it provides.”

The 14-point message was published after a Jan. 9-12 meeting of the European Catholic-Orthodox Forum, co-chaired in Paris by Hungarian Cardinal Peter Erdo, former president of the Council of European Bishops’ Conferences, and Metropolitan Gennadios of Sassima for the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople.

It said Catholic and Orthodox bishops deplored “crimes that may have been committed in the name of religion,” but believed their churches should not be blamed “for attitudes of intolerance that are inadmissible nowadays, but used to be shared by societies in the past.”
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: January 17, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9617
Categories: CNSIn this article: Catholic, Orthodox, terrorism
Transmis : 17 janvier 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9617
Catégorie : CNSDans cet article : Catholic, Orthodox, terrorism


Patience is vital in journey to shared Eucharist among all Christians

With patience, the day will come where all Christians will share in the Eucharist. CNS photo/Gregory A. ShemitzWhile attending an ecumenical service at a Lutheran church in Rome a year ago, Pope Francis encountered a Lutheran woman who was married to a Roman Catholic. She asked the Pope why she could not receive the Eucharist while attending Catholic services with her husband.

Caught unawares by this spur-of-the-moment question, Pope Francis’ immediate reply was to suggest that the woman should follow her conscience. It was the type of pastoral response that has become a trademark of Pope Francis, but it would be a mistake to believe his intention was to introduce a new Church teaching. His pastoral response does, however, signal that ancient barriers may well be in the process of reform.

Most Roman Catholics are probably aware that Protestants should not receive communion at a Catholic celebration of the Eucharist. But few probably know the reason why. Likewise, it is also fair to suggest that Catholics attending a Protestant service are often uncertain whether it is proper to receive Eucharist in a Protestant church.

Amid this uncertainty, I suspect a common response today from both Catholics and Protestants is to feel less conscience-bound to refrain from eucharistic sharing at each other’s gatherings.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: January 17, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9613
Categories: Catholic RegisterIn this article: Catholic, Christian unity, sacramental sharing
Transmis : 17 janvier 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9613
Catégorie : Catholic RegisterDans cet article : Catholic, Christian unity, sacramental sharing


Reformation Anniversary: Statement from the Archbishops of Canterbury and York

The Archbishops of Canterbury and York, Justin Welby and John Sentamu“This year, churches around the world will be marking the great significance of the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation in Europe, dated from Martin Luther’s 95 Theses protesting against the practice of indulgences, on 31 October 1517 at Wittenberg. The Church of England will be participating in various ways, including sharing in events with Protestant church partners from Continental Europe.

The Reformation was a process of both renewal and division amongst Christians in Europe. In this Reformation Anniversary year, many Christians will want to give thanks for the great blessings they have received to which the Reformation directly contributed. Amongst much else these would include clear proclamation of the gospel of grace, the availability of the Bible to all in their own language and the recognition of the calling of lay people to serve God in the world and in the church.

Many will also remember the lasting damage done five centuries ago to the unity of the Church, in defiance of the clear command of Jesus Christ to unity in love. Those turbulent years saw Christian people pitted against each other, such that many suffered persecution and even death at the hands of others claiming to know the same Lord. A legacy of mistrust and competition would then accompany the astonishing global spread of Christianity in the centuries that followed. All this leaves us much to ponder.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: January 17, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9615
Categories: ACNSIn this article: Anglican, Christian unity, Church of England, John Sentamu, Justin Welby, Reformation
Transmis : 17 janvier 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9615
Catégorie : ACNSDans cet article : Anglican, Christian unity, Church of England, John Sentamu, Justin Welby, Reformation


The sweet song of Christian unity

Our Lord and his apostles used many figures of speech to describe the Church. From our beloved St. Paul: “We are God’s fellow labourers; you are God’s field, God’s building” (1 Cor. 3:9). “You are the body of Christ and individually members of it” (1 Cor. 12:27). Or Jesus’ words: “Fear not, little flock” (Luke 12:32a). “I am the vine; you are the branches” (John 15:5a).

Many of us have admired a well-ordered cathedral, such as St. Paul’s, London, or All Saints, Nairobi. We recognise — almost unconsciously — the beauty of the human person, of a pastoral scene or vineyard. No wonder they make fitting images for the Church, the heavenly Jerusalem, a city “at unity with itself” (Ps. 122:3).

Our experience of the Church’s unity tends to fall short of these glorious figures. We see “hatred, discord, jealousy, fits of rage, selfish ambition, dissensions, factions” (see Gal. 5:19-21).

In recognition of this, Anglicans have turned to other images over the past 14 years: among them, “walking together in synodality,” “walking apart,” or even “walking at a distance.” This language proves useful, vividly illustrating different degrees or intensities of communion: some choose to be close; some go their own way; some wander onto the wrong path.

Through such images, we see how harmony, order, and unity are gifts received, but also unwrapped and used. A field must be cultivated, a building maintained, a vine pruned.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: January 18, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9621
Categories: ACNS, OpinionIn this article: Anglican, WPCU
Transmis : 18 janvier 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9621
Catégorie : ACNS, OpinionDans cet article : Anglican, WPCU


Unity Week: Cardinal Koch celebrates a “truly ecumenical year”

Cardinal Kurt Koch with Rev Mounib Younan, Pope Francis and Rev Martin Junge in Lund Cathedral on October 31st, 2016. Photo: APAs we mark the annual week of prayer for Christian Unity, Catholics have much to celebrate because 2016 was “truly an ecumenical year”. That’s the view of Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, who accompanied Pope Francis on all his ecumenical journeys throughout the past year.

The cardinal was reflecting on the theme for this week of prayer which is centred on a verse from St Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians: ‘Reconciliation: the love of Christ compels us’. Members of the Council of Christian Churches in Germany were asked to prepare material on this theme which is set in the context of this year’s 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

Cardinal Koch says the leitmotif for this week of prayer is reconciliation, proposed by Christians in Germany, where the Reformation began. While we have much gratitude for the Reformation and the rediscovery of all that is in common between Lutherans and Catholics, he says, we must also recognise the painful history of the last 500 years. Though Luther did not want to divide the Church, he notes the “horrible confessional wars” that followed the Reformation “transformed Europe into a red sea of blood”. We must acknowledge both of these pages, he says, working for repentance and reconciliation, but also showing gratitude for the gifts of the Reformation.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: January 18, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9619
Categories: Vatican NewsIn this article: Kurt Koch, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, WPCU
Transmis : 18 janvier 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9619
Catégorie : Vatican NewsDans cet article : Kurt Koch, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, WPCU


Luther and the Reformation – a new video resource

Five hundred years ago, Martin Luther kicked off the Protestant Reformation, which contributed to the birth of our modern age. In this one-hour special — filmed on location in Europe — Rick Steves tells the story of a humble monk who lived a dramatic life. Rick visits key sites relating to the Reformation (including Erfurt, Wittenberg, and Rome) and explores the complicated political world of 16th-century Europe — from indulgences to iconoclasts, and from the printing press to the Counter-Reformation. It’s a story of power, rebellion, and faith that you’ll never forget.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: January 21, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9624
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: Martin Luther, Reformation
Transmis : 21 janvier 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9624
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : Martin Luther, Reformation


Mennonite World Conference completes dialogue with Catholics, Lutherans

A five-year discussion of baptism among Mennonites, Catholics and Lutherans has yielded new insights.

Representatives of the Catholic Church’s Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, the Lutheran World Federation, and the Mennonite World Conference gathered Feb. 9-14 in Augsburg, Germany for the fifth and final meeting of the Trilateral Dialogue Commission on Baptism.

John Rempel of Canada said reflecting on each group’s practice of baptism helped participants learn to respect, trust and challenge each other.

“From the Lutherans, I have seen more clearly that their concern about justification by grace through faith is not that discipleship is a secondary matter,” said Rempel, who is professor emeritus of Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary in Elkhart, Ind., and the Toronto School of Theology. “Their concern is that following Christ be a lifestyle of gratitude for God’s grace and not good works to earn God’s favour.

“From the Catholics, I have learned that the sacrament of baptism does not have an automatic role in salvation. If someone persistently lives life against the Spirit of Christ, baptism will not save them.”
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: March 21, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9641
Categories: NewsIn this article: baptism, Lutheran World Federation, Mennonite World Conference, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity
Transmis : 21 mars 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9641
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : baptism, Lutheran World Federation, Mennonite World Conference, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity


Catholics and Evangelicals in Dialogue: A Small Group Opportunity

Pastor Harry StraussPastor Harry Strauss, co-chair of the Saskatoon Catholic and Evangelical Dialogue, has written a small group resource specifically for dialogue. It is entitled Catholics and Evangelicals in Dialogue: A Small Group Discussion Guide. It is 7 sessions in length, addressing the topics of revelation, the church, salvation, baptism, communion, the communion of the saints, and missional engagement. It is designed for laypeople, shaped as a user-friendly resource. Anticipated outcomes include new friendships, shaped around spiritually engaging conversations, and most importantly, relational growth in Jesus Christ. The material has been field tested some, with good results. However, there is a desire for additional testing. If interested in being part of this effort, particularly in initiating and leading a small group, please contact Pastor Harry Strauss at harry@forestgrovecc.com or call 306-280-7147.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: March 22, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9639
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: Catholic, Evangelicals, resources, Saskatoon
Transmis : 22 mars 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9639
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : Catholic, Evangelicals, resources, Saskatoon


Towards Unity: Ecumenical Dialogue 500 Years after the Reformation

Towards Unity: Ecumenical Dialogue 500 Years after the Reformation is edited by Archbishop Donald Bolen, Nicholas Jesson, and Sr. Donna Geernaert, SC. It is available from Novalis.ca, or in the USA from Paulist Press. ISBN: 978-2-8968-8422-3 (Novalis) and 978-0-8091-5349-7 (Paulist Press)Those who work in the field of Christian unity for any length of time are quick to point out that ecumenism is the work of the Holy Spirit. We say that not to sound pious but because we know firsthand two things: from our failed efforts, that we cannot bring about unity by ourselves no matter how hard we try; and from our successes, that something else is operative in this work of dialogue and reconciliation. God’s grace shapes our efforts in countless ways, experienced in a deep yearning for unity, in the insights which come forth from dialogue, in the moments of breakthrough when new understandings are reached, in the relationships and bonds of communion that are formed when we work with other Christians at the service of unity.

Ecumenism is a work of the Holy Spirit in the churches as they put themselves at the service of Jesus’ desire that his disciples be reconciled, and it is a work of the Spirit in people’s lives. This volume, which reflects on ecumenical achievements and hopes as we mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, is a celebration of the work of the Holy Spirit in the churches and ecclesial communities of the West as they have sought to address conflicts and heal divisions. It is also a celebration of the work of the Holy Spirit in the ecumenical ministry of Monsignor John Radano, and in a secondary but very real way, of each of the contributors to this volume. John Radano, generally known by his dialogue partners and colleagues as Jack, served as head of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity‘s (PCPCU) Western section for nearly a quarter century, from 1984 to 2008. In this capacity, he participated in dialogues with Lutheran, Reformed, Baptist, Mennonite, Classical Pentecostal, and Evangelical traditions, and served as liaison with the World Council of Churches‘ Commission on Faith and Order. Jack was also involved in relations with the Anglican Communion, the World Methodist Council, and the Global Christian Forum, so had a truly comprehensive involvement in relations with the Catholic Church’s dialogue and consultation partners in the West.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: April 1, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9672
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: books, Christian unity, Donald Bolen, Donna Geernaert, Nicholas Jesson
Transmis : 1 avril 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9672
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : books, Christian unity, Donald Bolen, Donna Geernaert, Nicholas Jesson


Subject Matters: interview with Nicholas Jesson about ‘Towards Unity’

In 2017, we mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. This Festschrift in honour of Monsignor John Radano, who served as head of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity‘s Western section for nearly 25 years, offers a window on what has been achieved through ecumenical dialogue over the past 50 years. It also reminds us of the importance of ecumenical friendship in advancing the cause of Christian unity.

Since the Reformation, Christian unity has suffered many failures. Yet, especially in more recent times, it has also celebrated encouraging successes. Disparate Christian traditions are beginning to trust each other. Will Christians eventually find one shared identity? What are the theological and ecclesial challenges ahead? This timely collection of essays by prominent Catholic and Protestant ecumenists witnesses a hope for a future Christian unity born out of 50 years of honest and genuine dialogue.

Towards Unity – a collection of papers by major ecumenical contributors – reflects with passion and hope on bilateral dialogues, the ecumenical movement, and organizations that promote multilateral relationships. By the grace of the Holy Spirit, the scandal of division is giving birth to renewed relationships, dialogue, and awareness.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: April 15, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9673
Categories: News, ResourcesIn this article: books, Christian unity, Nicholas Jesson
Transmis : 15 avril 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9673
Catégorie : News, ResourcesDans cet article : books, Christian unity, Nicholas Jesson


WCRC’s Ferguson calls for joint LWF-WCRC assemblies

Chris Ferguson, general secretary of the World Communion of Reformed Churches (WCRC), addressed the Lutheran World Federation's Assembly on May 13, 2017 in Windhoek, Namibia. Photo: LWF/Albin HillertIn his greetings to the Assembly of the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), Chris Ferguson, general secretary of the World Communion of Reformed Churches (WCRC), called for consideration of a joint meeting between the organizations.

“There are many things that we can and should do together,” Ferguson said. “I give thanks that God has given us the gift of partnership in mission, witness and diakonia with LWF. I hope that in six or seven years we will be able to celebrate our general assemblies in the same time and place. Separate meetings, yes, but joined for common worship, reflection and witness together. Can you imagine that! Let’s think about it!”

Ferguson noted that the two organizations continue to grow closer together, despite the WCRC’s move from Geneva to Hannover. In particular he raised the WCRC’s upcoming association with the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification (JDDJ), which will be signed at a special worship service in Wittenberg during the WCRC’s General Council.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: May 15, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9693
Categories: NewsIn this article: Lutheran World Federation, World Communion of Reformed Churches
Transmis : 15 mai 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9693
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Lutheran World Federation, World Communion of Reformed Churches


Anglicans and Roman Catholics agree statement on ecclesiology

Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) met in the central German city of Erfurt early this month for their seventh meeting. They chose to meet in the city to mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation – it is here that Martin Luther was ordained and lived as a monk. Photo: ARCICAnglicans and Roman Catholics should see in each other “a community in which the Holy Spirit is alive and active,” the latest communiqué from the official ecumenical dialogue between the Anglican Communion and the Roman Catholic Church says.

Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) met in the central German city of Erfurt early this month for their seventh meeting. They chose to meet in the city to mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation – it is here that Martin Luther was ordained and lived as a monk.

During their meeting, the members of ARCIC agreed the text of a new statement looking at Anglican and Roman Catholic ecclesiology. Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be Church – Local, Regional, Universal, to be known as The Erfurt Document, will be published next year.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: May 30, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9695
Categories: ACNS, CommuniquéIn this article: Anglican, ARCIC, Catholic, ecclesiology
Transmis : 30 mai 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9695
Catégorie : ACNS, CommuniquéDans cet article : Anglican, ARCIC, Catholic, ecclesiology


Canadian Churches’ Forum becomes a CCC Reference Group

Canadian Council of ChurchesLast week, the Canadian Churches Forum and the Canadian Council of Churches (CCC) came together at the CCC Governing Board meetings to make some important decisions about the future of their relationship and work. A motion was adopted that the CCF become the “Forum for Intercultural Leadership and Learning (FILL): A Reference Group of the Canadian Council of Churches.”

Moving more fully into the Council in this way opens the potential of working more closely with the CCC’s 26 member denominations and their diversity and experience. The Canadian Council of Churches is the broadest and most inclusive ecumenical body in the world, representing denominations of Anglican; Evangelical; Free Church; Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox; Protestant; and Catholic traditions. Together, the CCC churches represent more than 85% of Christians in Canada.

Also being considered are some shifts that will make Forum program alumni and others more creatively part of the work with a larger portion of this reference group’s resources going to supporting and networking people across Canada with a calling to intercultural ministry.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: May 31, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9689
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canadian Council of Churches, Forum for Intercultural Leadership and Learning, intercultural ministry
Transmis : 31 mai 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9689
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canadian Council of Churches, Forum for Intercultural Leadership and Learning, intercultural ministry


Lebanese pastor elected as WCRC president

The World Communion of Reformed Churches elected anew executive at their General Council meeting in Leipzig, Germany. From left to right: Rev. Sylvana Maria Apituley (Indonesia), Raissa Vieira Brasil (Brazil), Rev. Dr. Lisa Vander Wal (United States), Rev. Najla Kassab (Lebanon), Rev. Dr. Samuel Ayete-Nyampong (Ghana), and Dr. Johann Weusmann (Germany). Photo: WCRCThe Rev. Najla Kassab, a minister in the National Evangelical Synod of Syria and Lebanon (NESSL), has been elected president of the World Communion of Reformed Churches (WCRC), which groups more than 225 churches in over 110 countries.

“With her experience and many gifts, Najla’s vision, insight, spiritual strength and grace make her the right person to lead us forward as president,” said Alison McDonald, the moderator of a Nominating Committee that brought a slate of nominees for the WCRC Executive Committee to its General Council.

The elections took place on 7 July, the final day of the Council, which has been meeting in the eastern German city of Leipzig since 29 June. Of the 22 members of the new Executive Committee, 10 are men and 12 women; 15 are ordained and 7 are lay people. Five of the members of the Executive Committee are young adults under 30 years of age, including one of the vice-presidents.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: July 7, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9739
Categories: NewsIn this article: synods, World Communion of Reformed Churches
Transmis : 7 juillet 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9739
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : synods, World Communion of Reformed Churches


The Challenges of Ecumenism

Pope Francis and Patriarch Bartholomew at the Western Wall in Jerusalem, in 2014When we think of Church teachings that are uncomfortable to discuss and difficult to live up to these days our minds tend to go to controversial issues like that of contraception, homosexuality, gender and so forth. Yet, in many ways, the Church’s views on ecumenism are for many even more uncomfortable. On this topic, however, it is all too easy to say yes, yes with one’s lips, while denying and undermining this teaching in practice.

Ecumenism is the attempt to strengthen unity between the diverse Christian Churches through dialogue about doctrine, prayer in common, cooperation in good works and other means that deepen mutual understanding and growth. In the case of the Catholic Church, these endeavours are also motivated by a desire that our Churches may unite in full communion, however remote that hope may seem to our eyes here and now.

A key to the possibility of any ecumenism lies in a few basic realizations. The first is that we are all genuinely Christians, baptized into the body of Christ. This entails that there is always more that unites us than what divides us. The important essentials of the faith: the Trinity, the Incarnation, and the role that baptism plays in drawing us into the participation of the divine life are all unifying features of Christian life. In this respect, we should be grateful for the profound unity that already does exist among the majority of Christian communities (Unitatis Redintegratio, no. 3).
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: August 29, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9742
Categories: OpinionIn this article: Catholic, ecumenism
Transmis : 29 aoüt 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9742
Catégorie : OpinionDans cet article : Catholic, ecumenism


Irish Anglican and Roman Catholic bishops meet

In the spirit of the recommendation of the International Anglican-Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission (IARCCUM) that there should be regular meetings of Anglican and Roman Catholic bishops in individual countries to discuss common concerns, a sixth such meeting of Irish bishops took place in Dublin on Saturday, 28th September. Thirteen bishops were present representing the Irish Episcopal Conference and the House of Bishops. In an atmosphere marked by positivity and candour, the bishops discussed a wide range of issues of common interest in relation to the ministry and service churches offer in Irish society, both north and south of the border. These included education; engagement with young people; the World Meeting of Families, emphasizing its ecumenical possibilities; the plight of refugees and migrants; and current social issues. All the participants said the experience was very valuable as they shared insightful perspectives that engendered renewed commitment to promoting the Kingdom of God.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: October 12, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9756
Categories: NewsIn this article: Anglican, bishops, Catholic, Ireland
Transmis : 12 octobre 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9756
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Anglican, bishops, Catholic, Ireland


Hiltz expects sanctions on Canadian church if it approves same-sex marriage

Primates from around the Anglican Communion take part in a service at Canterbury Cathedral during the 2017 Primates' Meeting held in Canterbury October 2-6. Photo: ACNSArchbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, says sanctions will likely be placed on the church by the primates of the Anglican Communion if it proceeds to amend the marriage canon (church law) to allow same-sex marriages.

He also questions whether the primates, by taking these punitive measures, are moving beyond the original purpose of their yearly meetings.

“Oh yes,” Hiltz replied Thursday, October 12 when asked by the Anglican Journal if he expected the primates would impose sanctions on the Canadian church if a motion to amend the marriage canon passes its required second reading at General Synod in 2019.

Hiltz had recently returned from the 2017 meeting of primates from across the Anglican Communion held in Canterbury, England., October 2-6. On the second day of the meeting, the Scottish Episcopal Church, which voted in June to allow same-sex marriages, agreed to accept the same “consequences” that the primates had imposed on The Episcopal Church (TEC) in 2016 after its decision to allow same-sex marriages.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: October 13, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9759
Categories: Anglican JournalIn this article: Anglican Church of Canada, Primates Meeting
Transmis : 13 octobre 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9759
Catégorie : Anglican JournalDans cet article : Anglican Church of Canada, Primates Meeting


Canadian theologian Gregory Baum dead at 94

Canadian theologian Gregory Baum dead at 94. Photo: Michael SwanOne of Canada’s most influential and controversial theologians, among the few remaining living links to the Second Vatican Council, has died.

Gregory Baum, author of the first draft of Nostra Aetate, was 94 years old.

Baum was admitted to St. Mary’s Hospital in Montreal Oct. 8. “I’m disappearing inside,” he told a friend. He decided not to continue the dialysis treatment which had kept him alive the last four years.

As a young theologian, Baum shot to prominence in the early days of the Second Vatican Council, mentored by Cardinal Augustin Bea. A key ally of Pope St. John XXIII, Bea looked for credible Catholic experts on Catholic-Jewish relations and found his man in Baum.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: October 19, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9773
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, Gregory Baum, Jewish-Christian relations, Québec, theologian
Transmis : 19 octobre 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9773
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, Gregory Baum, Jewish-Christian relations, Québec, theologian


Justin Welby: Luther’s historic act did so much to shape the world we live in

A service to mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation was held at Westminster Abbey, London on 31 October 2017. The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby addressed the congregation at the worship led by the Dean of Westminster Rev. Dr John Hall and attended by LWF General Secretary Rev. Dr Martin Junge and PCPCU Secretary Bishop Dr Brian Farrell. Photo: Andrew Dunsmore/Westminster AbbeyYou might have heard the story about the German friar who nailed 95 provocative statements to a church door a long time ago, triggering something we now call the Reformation.

If you’re looking for a modern interpretation, 500 years ago next Tuesday, Martin Luther posted a particularly incendiary series of tweets. He wanted to provoke debate about corruption in the Roman Catholic Church. He certainly achieved that.

Sadly, Luther couldn’t take advantage of Twitter — and it’s generally accepted that he didn’t actually hammer his arguments to a church door. Instead he used the then cutting-edge technology of printing. But the impact was no less dramatic. What Luther wrote went around Europe incredibly quickly; it was the viral content of its day.

Within two decades Europe was split between Protestants and Catholics in a process called the Reformation. The conflict that generated (which began in England in the early 1530s) continued for hundreds of years. The first century or so was especially bloody and violent.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: October 27, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9801
Categories: OpinionIn this article: Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, Martin Luther, Reformation
Transmis : 27 octobre 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9801
Catégorie : OpinionDans cet article : Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, Martin Luther, Reformation


Reformation commemoration a ‘powerful symbol of hope’

Bishop Heinrich Bedford-Strohm preaching at the 31 October service at Wittenberg's Castle Church. Photo: Gläscher/EKDChurch and political leaders have marked the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s Reformation in Wittenberg, Germany where on 31 October 1517 he published his 95 Theses denouncing church abuses.

“It was an act of liberation when, 500 years ago today, the Augustinian monk Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses in Wittenberg, perhaps even a few metres from here, on the door of this church,” Bishop Heinrich Bedford-Strohm, chairperson of the Council of the Evangelical Church in Germany, said in his sermon at the 31 October service at Wittenberg’s Castle Church.

“A spiritual renewal went out from Wittenberg, to people in Germany, Europe and worldwide. To men and women from all social classes,” said Bedford-Strohm.

The service opened with the singing of Luther’s hymn “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God” whose words are inscribed around the tower of the Castle Church, and included music by 18th century composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

German president Frank-Walter Steinmeier and chancellor Angela Merkel joined church leaders at the service, including Cardinal Reinhard Marx, president of the German Bishops’ Conference, and the general secretary of the World Council of Churches, Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: October 31, 2017 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=9799
Categories: WCC NewsIn this article: Germany, Martin Luther, Reformation
Transmis : 31 octobre 2017 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=9799
Catégorie : WCC NewsDans cet article : Germany, Martin Luther, Reformation


  1     2