Religious leaders in Saskatchewan concerned about assisted dying policies

 — June 21, 201621 juin 2016

Saskatchewan Minister of Health Dustin Duncan speaks to the press after meeting with Saskatchewan faith leaders who presented a Joint Statement on Freedom of Conscience and Palliative Care to the Saskatchewan government and Official Opposition
Saskatchewan Minister of Health Dustin Duncan speaks to the press after meeting with Saskatchewan faith leaders who presented an Interfaith Statement on Freedom of Conscience and Palliative Care to the Saskatchewan government and Official Opposition.
by Jennifer Graham, Canadian Press

Religious leaders across Saskatchewan say doctors who don’t want to help patients die shouldn’t be forced to refer them to another physician who will.

Christian, Muslim and Jewish leaders met with Health Minister Dustin Duncan at the Saskatchewan legislature Tuesday and said facilities should not be forced to help people end their lives either. Duncan said the province is looking at ways to accommodate those concerns about the new federal law that allows medical assisted dying.

The law says doctors can’t be forced to provide the service. But the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan policy also says they “must not abandon a patient who makes this request” and they need to arrange “timely access” to another physician or resources.

“We also feel that people do have a right to information,” said Mary Deutscher, with the justice and peace commission of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon. “We have no problem with providing that information, but there’s something different about a direct referral, that actually says that you need to find someone who will carry through on what we see as a very harmful action. Do you want to force doctors to have to harm people that they care for? And many of these doctors do see this as a harmful action.”

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Posted: June 21, 2016 • Permanent link: https://ecumenism.net/?p=9204
Categories: NewsIn this article: freedom of conscience, palliative care, physician assisted suicide, religious freedom, Saskatchewan
Transmis : 21 juin 2016 • Lien permanente : https://ecumenism.net/?p=9204
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : freedom of conscience, palliative care, physician assisted suicide, religious freedom, Saskatchewan

Pope calls euthanasia triumph of selfishness, not act of compassion

 — June 10, 201610 juin 2016

Pope Francis says euthanasia is not an act of compassion. CNS file photo/Paul HaringGrowing acceptance of euthanasia does not indicate increased compassion, but highlights the rise of a selfish “throwaway culture” that casts aside the sick, the dying and those who do not satisfy the perceived requirements of a healthy life, Pope Francis said.

In a culture that is increasingly “technological and individualistic,” some tend to “hide behind alleged compassion to justify killing a patient,” the Pope told health professionals from Spain and Latin America June 9.

“True compassion does not marginalize, humiliate or exclude, much less celebrate a patient passing away,” the Pope said. “You know well that would mean the triumph of selfishness, of that ‘throwaway culture’ that rejects and despises people who do not meet certain standards of health, beauty or usefulness.”
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Anglican-Roman Catholic Covenant continues to thrive

 — June 1, 20161 juin 2016

The Anglican-Roman Catholic Covenant between the Regina archdiocese and the Diocese of Qu’Appelle signed in 2011 continues to grow, with activities between the two faith communities. They gathered May 15, Pentecost Sunday, at St. Paul’s Cathedral for a traditional Anglican evensong service with a homily delivered by archdiocesan administrator Rev. Lorne Crozon and the apostolic blessing performed by Winnipeg Archbishop Emeritus James Weisgerber. Canon Michael Jackson, Anglican co-chair of the Covenant Implementation Committee, opened the service, followed by St. Paul’s Cathedral dean Michael Sinclair, who welcomed everyone.

Susan Klein, Roman Catholic co-chair of the Covenant Implementation Committee reported on the numerous activities the covenant participants have shared since the last time they met. Among the highlights was Signs of Hope: A Conversation on First Nations Ministry, held in the fall of 2015. It attracted Aboriginal and non-Aboriginals who engaged in conversations following presentations by Rev. Dale Gillman and Sister Re-Anne Letourneau.

Sinclair spent a week in Rome attending a Christian leadership course at the Anglican Centre, visited Assisi and attended a public audience with Pope Francis. Archdeacon Catherine Harper presented on the diaconate program, and Canon Jackson is in touch with the Roman Catholic Diaconate programs in Saskatoon and Prince Albert as well as Roman Catholic authors and diaconate leaders in the U.S.

In addition to these highlights, there were several joint parish activities, including a vacation Bible school, marriage course, Advent and lenten programs. “Concrete examples of what we are doing together,” said Klein in her report.
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Faith & Witness: a podcast exploring ecumenism

 — June 1, 20161 juin 2016

Adaptation of 'Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee' by Ludolf Backhuysen, 1695 (Wikimedia; Public Domain)The Canadian Council of Churches and its Commission on Faith and Witness are proud to announce the release of the first episode of Faith & Witness, a podcast exploring ecumenism. Each month we’ll learn what happens when churches talk to each other, and about the people who have spent their lives in dialogue with Christians of other traditions.

This month’s episode features two segments. The first is a dialogue between Fr. Geoffrey Ready of the Orthodox Church in America (Canadian Archdiocese), and the Rev. Ian Sloan of the United Church of Canada. Fr. Geoffrey and Rev. Ian talk about the idea of salvation, and how Orthodox and United beliefs about salvation are the same, and how they differ.

In our second segment, Associate Secretary for the Commission Dr. Mary Marrocco interviews Fr. Damian MacPherson, SA, Director of the Office of Ecumenical & Interfaith Affairs for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Toronto.

Please join us! You can download the episode here. If you have questions you would like to hear answered on the podcast, or about anything else, please email. Theme and interstitial music by Telepathic Teddy Bear (“Churches”; CC BY 4.0)
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President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima an opportunity for moral leadership

 — May 27, 201627 mai 2016

On the occasion of US President Barack Obama’s visit to the Japanese city of Hiroshima on 27 May, WCC general secretary Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit sent greetings, noting that this is a time when signs of peace and justice are sorely needed.

“We pray that you will be able to talk with the aging survivors of the atomic bombing – the hibakusha – who live to tell their story in the determined hope that no one will ever again suffer their fate,” Tveit wrote. “They speak for the hundreds of thousands of people from Japan, Korea and other countries whose lives were shattered by the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.”

Tveit urged Obama to share his vision of a world without nuclear weapons. “The World Council of Churches was founded in 1948, in the shadow of the atomic bombings,” Tveit wrote. “We believe that the case for the elimination of nuclear weapons is grounded in the responsibility to protect and care for goodness of all that God has created and for the dignity of all human beings, made in the image of God.”

Using the energy of the atom in ways that threaten and destroy life is a sinful misuse of the fundamental building blocks of God’s creation, Tveit added in the letter. “Churches in every region of the world refuse to accept that the mass destruction of other peoples can ever be a legitimate means of protecting one’s own people.”
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Faith-based communities increasingly effective in addressing humanitarian needs, says WCC general secretary

 — May 26, 201626 mai 2016

“There is a remarkable change towards acknowledging the role of faith-based communities and their resources to address humanitarian needs,” said Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, general secretary of the World Council of Churches (WCC), during the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS), held in Istanbul, Turkey, 23-24 May.

“This is promising for those who need more assistance, and it is promising for the constructive cooperation needed,” he added.

The summit was the first of its kind in the 70-year history of the United Nations. The motivation came from the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-Moon, who called for humanity to be placed at the heart of global decision-making.

The framework of the summit was built upon the principle that, in order to deliver for humanity, stakeholders must act on five core responsibilities: preventing and ending conflict; respecting rules of war; leaving no one behind; working differently to end need; and investing in humanity.

The WCC was represented at the WHS by the general secretary Tveit and the council’s representative to the United Nations in New York, Rudelmar Bueno de Faria, as well as by several member churches, national councils of churches and partner organizations, such as ACT Alliance and its members.
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WCC and WEA meet, explore areas of future cooperation

 — May 26, 201626 mai 2016

Representatives of the World Evangelical Alliance (WEA) and the World Council of Churches (WCC) met in the Ecumenical Institute at Bossey, Switzerland to explore and discuss possible areas of future cooperation. Photo: WCC/Marianne EjderstenThe leadership and representatives of the World Evangelical Alliance (WEA) and the World Council of Churches (WCC) met in the Ecumenical Institute at Bossey, Switzerland to explore and discuss possible areas of future cooperation.

The 20 May meeting featured introductions to the work of the WEA and the WCC, and participants reflected together on current developments in society and churches, and on evangelical and ecumenical movements. The WCC general secretary and WEA secretary general took part.

The two organizations shared current plans and discussed possibilities for closer collaboration on thematic areas such as “public witness and peace-building in inter-religious contexts” and “theological reflection, education and formation.”

This was the second meeting with the leadership and representatives, although it was the first meeting with both heads of the organizations present and where perceptions about both the WEA and WCC were discussed.
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