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Three Views on Eastern Orthodoxy and Evangelicalism
Stamoolis, James J., ed.
HarperCollins Canada / Zondervan, 2004
ISBN: 978-0-3102-3539-2
Subject: Evangelicalism, Eastern Orthodoxy, dialogue


Contributions by Bradley Nassif, Michael Horton, Vladimir Berzonsky, George Hancock-Stefan, and Edward Rommen.

To some Western evangelicals, the practices of Eastern Orthodoxy seem mysterious and perhaps even unbiblical. Then again, from an Orthodox perspective, evangelicals lack the spiritual roots provided by centuries-old church traditions. Are the differences between these two branches of Christianity so sharp that to shake hands is to compromise the gospel itself? Or is there room for agreement? Are Eastern Orthodoxy and evangelicalism at all compatible? Yes, no, maybe—this book allows five leading authorities to present their different views, have them critiqued by their fellow authors, and respond to the critiques. Writing from an Orthodox perspective with a strong appreciation for evangelicalism, Bradley Nassif makes a case for compatibility. Michael Horton and Vladimir Berzonsky take the opposite stance from their respective evangelical and Orthodox backgrounds. And George Hancock-Stefan (Evangelical) and Edward Rommen (Orthodox) each offer a qualified "perhaps."

Webeditor's comment: Readers should be aware that this text follows a comparative method that considers compatibility to be essential for Christian unity. Readers should evaluate this implicit assumption carefully.