Archive for tag: Canada

Archive pour tag : Canada

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Ordinariate ‘instrument’ of unity

Ottawa Archbishop Terrence Prendergast lays hands on Fr. Jim Tilley of Oshawa, Ont., one of four men ordained to serve as priests in the Anglican Ordinariate. Photo by Deborah GyapongFormer Anglicans who convert to Catholicism must be a bridge to Christian unity and a force for true ecumenism, said the leader of North America’s Anglican ordinariate as four former Anglican priests were ordained to the Catholic priesthood.

“If the Ordinariate is to be anything worthy and worth keeping for the long term, it must be an instrument of Christian unity,” said Msgr. Jeffrey Steenson, head of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter (POCSP).

In a Dec. 14 ceremony in Ottawa’s Notre Dame Cathedral, Ottawa Archbishop Terrence Prendergast ordained Bryan Kipling Cooper, Douglas Hayman, both of Ottawa, John Hodgins of Toronto and James Tilley of Oshawa, Ont., to serve as priests in the Ordinariate.
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Posted: December 19, 2013 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7000
Categories: NewsIn this article: Anglican, Canada, Catholic, ordinariate
Transmis : 19 décembre 2013 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7000
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Anglican, Canada, Catholic, ordinariate


Has Christ Been Divided? The Week of Prayer for Christian Unity in 2014

Cristo non può essere diviso - The artwork from the Italian translation of the 2014 resources for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. Credit: Centro Pro Unione, RomeThe world will pray with Canada this January, and in a special way with native Canadians. For the second time in the 106-year history of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, Canadians have written the biblical reflections, prayer services and educational materials to be used worldwide.

Celebrated Jan. 18-25, the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity is prepared each year in a different country under the direction of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity in Rome and the Geneva-based World Council of Churches’ Faith and Order Commission. Since the two major ecumenical organizations took over the annual event in 1968, Canada is just the second country to be asked twice to prepare the worship and study material.

Coming back to Canada, the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity wanted to make sure the material is fresh and reflects a different perspective. In 1989 Canada’s offering was prepared by the Canadian Council of Churches. This time, preparations were led by the Canadian Centre for Ecumenism in Montreal and the Prairie Centre for Ecumenism in Saskatoon.

Having Canada’s independent ecumenical centres take over was the initiative of Saskatoon Bishop Donald Bolen, who for years worked on the Week of Prayer as an official for the Pontifical Council in Rome. Though the CCC did not lead the 2014 effort, general secretary Rev. Dr. Karen Hamilton played an important role helping to review the material, said Nicholas Jesson, ecumenical officer for the diocese of Saskatoon and part of the 2014 writing committee.
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Posted: January 2, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7054
Categories: Catholic Register, ResourcesIn this article: Canada, Centre Canadien d’œcuménisme, Prairie Centre for Ecumenism, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU
Transmis : 2 janvier 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7054
Catégorie : Catholic Register, ResourcesDans cet article : Canada, Centre Canadien d’œcuménisme, Prairie Centre for Ecumenism, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU


Has Christ Been Divided? Introduction to the WPCU 2014 theme

Is Christ Divided? - The artwork from the British and Irish resources for the 2014 Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. Credit: Churches Together in Britain and Ireland, LondonCanadians live in a country that is marked by diversity in language, culture, and even climate, and we also embody diversity in our expressions of Christian faith. Living with this diversity, but being faithful to Christ’s desire for the unity of his disciples, has led us to a reflection on Paul’s provocative question in 1 Corinthians: “Has Christ been Divided?” In faith we respond, “No!” yet our church communities continue to embody scandalous divisions. 1 Corinthians also points us to a way in which we can value and receive the gifts of others even now in the midst of our divisions, and that is an encouragement to us in our work for unity.

2. Canada is known for its natural splendour: its mountains, forests, lakes and rivers, seas of wheat and three ocean shorelines. Our land stretches from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the U.S. border to the north pole. This is a land rich in agriculture and natural resources. Canada is also a land of diverse peoples: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis,1 and many people who came to settle here from around the world. We have two official languages, French and English, yet many Canadians celebrate the cultural and linguistic heritage from their ancestral homelands. Our social and political divisions frequently hinge upon linguistic, cultural, and regional distinctions, yet we are learning to understand how these national identities contribute to a healthy Canadian diversity. Within this multicultural milieu, many Christians have brought their particular ways of worship and ministry. Paul’s letter addresses us within our diversity and invites us to recognize that as church in our particular places we are not to be isolated or to act over against each other, but rather to recognize our interconnectedness with all who call on the name of the Lord.
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Posted: January 8, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7051
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: Canada, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU
Transmis : 8 janvier 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7051
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : Canada, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU


Has Christ Been Divided? The Ecumenical Context in Canada

Le Christ est-il divisé ? - The artwork from the French resources for the 2014 Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. Credit: Unité Chrétienne, LyonAmong the many factors that influence Canadian religious experience is the sheer size of our country. Canada is the second largest country in the world, 40% of which is in the Arctic, north of 60o latitude. Stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the United States to the North Pole, Canada has ten provinces and three territories. We are surrounded by three oceans: the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic. Our only land border is with the United States and it has experienced almost 200 years of peace. Canada is a confederation of former British colonies, with a parliamentary form of government in a federal system of ten provinces and three territories. The union of the former colonial territories and independence from Britain occurred peacefully, and Canada remains a strong proponent of international engagement and cooperation. The vast distances between our cities have promoted both self-reliance and formation of distinct identities in the regions, but can also engender feelings of alienation or resentment.

Canada is known for its natural splendour: its mountains, forests, lakes and rivers, seas of wheat and three ocean shorelines. This is a land rich in agriculture and natural resources. Canada is also a land of diverse peoples: First Nations, Inuit, and Métis,2 and many people who came to settle here from around the world. We have two official languages, French and English, yet many Canadians also celebrate the cultural and linguistic heritages of their ancestral homelands.
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Posted: January 13, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7065
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: Canada, Centre Canadien d’œcuménisme, Prairie Centre for Ecumenism, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU
Transmis : 13 janvier 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7065
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : Canada, Centre Canadien d’œcuménisme, Prairie Centre for Ecumenism, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU


Unbearable Pain, Startling Hope: 40 years of Bold Witness to Ecumenical Social Justice

Be Not Afraid: 40 years of Bold Witness for Ecumenical Social JusticeKAIROS, the Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiative, is celebrating a 40th anniversary. KAIROS itself isn’t that old, but its predecessor groups, the Canadian ecumenical coalitions are. Those of us engaged in ecumenical work, whether in theological dialogues, ecumenical education, or collaborating in advocacy for social justice are rooted in the same call to witness to Christ and to engage in common mission. We give thanks for the work of the Canadian social justice coalitions and for KAIROS that continues to give witness to this legacy. Congratulations KAIROS on 40 years of witness!

The executive director of KAIROS, Jennifer Henry, gave a long sermon January 19th at St. Matthew’s Anglican Church in Etobicoke. She reflects on ‘40 Years of Bold Witness’ framing her thoughts with four characteristics of the “natural habitat’ of prophetic voices” outlined by Walter Brueggemann in “The Prophetic Imagination.” It is well worth a read for Jennifer’s strong knowledge of history and inspirational passion for justice.
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Posted: January 27, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7344
Categories: OpinionIn this article: Canada, KAIROS
Transmis : 27 janvier 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7344
Catégorie : OpinionDans cet article : Canada, KAIROS


TRC to hold final public event this March

Members of the the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), political leaders, church leaders and Aboriginal organizations celebrate the opening of the sixth national TRC event in Vancouver, September 2013.The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), formed in 2008 to help begin healing over Canada’s residential school system for Indigenous peoples, will be holding its final public event at the end of March in Edmonton.

Similar to past events, this one will feature traditional ceremonies, survivor gatherings and statements, an education day, and more.

Although the mandate of the TRC has been extended through 2015, this final public event signals the end of a journey and the beginning of a new one for those who have been involved.

National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald is already looking to the future.

“It has become more and more clear as we’ve gone on that this is a beginning, and not an end. This is the beginning of reconciliation. I don’t think that after we finish this, anybody will say ‘Well, we did that!'”

“I think the next steps on the path are the building of the positive relationships between non-Indigenous people and institutions, and Indigenous people. It’s all about building on the bedrock of reconciliation.”
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Posted: January 31, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7259
Categories: NewsIn this article: Anglican, Canada, Indigenous peoples, Truth and Reconciliation Commission
Transmis : 31 janvier 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7259
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Anglican, Canada, Indigenous peoples, Truth and Reconciliation Commission


The Montreal School of Theology celebrates 100 years of ecumenism

The centenary celebration Sept. 24 of what is now known as the Montreal School of Theology will probably pass almost unnoticed, at a time when religion is often a topic of strife. But in its quiet way, the anniversary is also a reminder that religious strife and debate in Montreal, Quebec and the rest of Canada have been around for a while. The three theological seminaries on the McGill University campus — Presbyterian, United Church and Anglican — will be celebrating 100 years of what is now known as ecumenism, a word hardly anyone used in that sense a century ago. The celebration will be a modest affair. Presbyterian College, the (United Church) United Theological College and the (Anglican) Montreal Diocesan Theological College will have open house at their respective quarters on University St. between 3:15 and 4:15 p.m. And there will be worship at 4:30 down the street in the Heritage Chapel of what was known until 1972 as Divinity Hall, but is now McGill’s Birks Building. On Friday, a select group will ponder the future of theological education in Montreal.
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Posted: September 23, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7850
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, ecumenism, Montréal, theological education
Transmis : 23 septembre 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7850
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, ecumenism, Montréal, theological education


Catholics and Anglicans celebrate new Canadian saints together

Pope Francis greets Cardinal Gérald Lacroix of Quebec at the conclusion of an Oct. 12 Mass of thanksgiving for the April canonization of two 17th-century Canadian saints. Photo: CNS/Paul HaringOn the Canadian Thanksgiving holiday, Pope Francis celebrated a Mass of Thanksgiving for two new Canadian saints: St. François de Laval and St. Marie de l’Incarnation. The two were made saints in April when Pope Francis set aside the normal process. The two were significant in spreading Catholicism in New France, both among the French settlers and the indigenous peoples. Laval (1623-1708) was the first bishop of Québec. Marie de l’Incarnation (1599-1672), an Ursuline sister, was responsible for establishing the first schools in the fledgling colony at Québec and for extending education to girls and natives. Pope Francis has described the new saints as models of spreading the faith. “Missionaries have gone out to call everyone, in the highways and byways of the world,” Francis said in his homily. “In this way they have done immense good for the Church, for once the Church stops moving, once she becomes closed in on herself, she falls ill, she can be corrupted, whether by sins or by that false knowledge cut off from God which is worldly secularism.”
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Posted: October 14, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7857
Categories: NewsIn this article: Anglican, Canada, Catholic, ecumenism, Francis, saints
Transmis : 14 octobre 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7857
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Anglican, Canada, Catholic, ecumenism, Francis, saints


United Church Asks for Clarity on Meaning of “Zero Tolerance”

The United Church of CanadaIn a letter to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, The United Church of Canada has asked for clear reassurance that the government does not intend to limit the democratic rights and freedoms of individuals and organizations opposed to Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territories.

The church’s letter was prompted by a recent CBC news story that cited the possibility of the government using hate crime laws to clamp down on activities they consider to be singling out Israel for criticism.
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Posted: May 13, 2015 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=8315
Categories: NewsIn this article: Canada, divestment, Israel, Palestine, United Church of Canada
Transmis : 13 mai 2015 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=8315
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Canada, divestment, Israel, Palestine, United Church of Canada


Canada’s First Nations urge churches to press for improved conditions in aboriginal communities

Perry Bellegarde, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations. Photo: United Church of CanadaWhat do indigenous peoples expect of churches in light of the report of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) on church-run residential schools for aboriginal children? Perry Bellegarde, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, responds in this interview with the World Council of Churches (WCC) Communications.

The TRC report on the impact of more than 100 years of residential schools includes 94 recommendations addressed to the country’s federal and provincial governments, churches and society at large. A number are related to concerns for child welfare, education, and health in indigenous communities.

Canada’s best-known aboriginal leader Perry Bellegarde is urging the country’s churches to take advantage of the current federal election campaign to press for measures to close the gap in the standard of living between Canada’s Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

“The gap is not good for the country. There is a high social cost,” says Bellegarde, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), the advocacy organization representing Canada’s 900,000 aboriginal people.

Bellegarde is urging church members to ask candidates about their plans for improving schooling, health care, and housing in Indigenous communities.
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Posted: October 8, 2015 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=8800
Categories: WCC NewsIn this article: Canada, Indigenous peoples, Truth and Reconciliation Commission
Transmis : 8 octobre 2015 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=8800
Catégorie : WCC NewsDans cet article : Canada, Indigenous peoples, Truth and Reconciliation Commission


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