Archive for category: The Tablet

Archive pour catégorie : The Tablet

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Cardinals in conflict

The recent elevation of 44 new cardinals may have seemed to show that for the Catholic Church, it was business as usual. In reality the ceremony marked a radical break. For this first consistory of the new millennium was at the same time a farewell ceremony for a whole era — the era of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger. The eminent prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), that capable and controversial guardian of Roman Catholic orthodoxy, had enjoyed a monopoly of spiritual power under papal primacy. Now that was challenged. The consistory was both an individual personal drama and an institutional setback to Roman centralism.
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Posted: April 28, 2001 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6706
Categories: The TabletIn this article: church, ecclesiology, Joseph Ratzinger, Second Vatican Council, theology, Walter Kasper
Transmis : 28 avril 2001 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6706
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : church, ecclesiology, Joseph Ratzinger, Second Vatican Council, theology, Walter Kasper


The Pope and the Mufti

Pope John Paul, who celebrated his eighty-first birthday this week, is a man in a hurry. In the twilight days of his long papacy, he is expanding the perspective of his by now traditional pastoral visits around the world and he is laying down markers for the future. These concern the future relations of the Roman Catholic Church both with the separated Orthodox Christian Churches, and with the other monotheistic religions, Islam and Judaism.

Hence the first-ever visit this month by a pope to a mosque, the impressive Great Umayyad Mosque in Damascus. Twenty years ago it would have been inconceivable that a pope from Rome should remove his shoes, put on white slippers and traverse one of the great Holy Places of Islam for a meeting with the Grand Mufti and other clerics in the courtyard of the mosque.
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Posted: May 19, 2001 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6735
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Christian, Christianity, Islam, John Paul II, Orthodox
Transmis : 19 mai 2001 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6735
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Christian, Christianity, Islam, John Paul II, Orthodox


Women raise their voices

An organisation bringing together campaigners from all over the world in favour of ordaining women met in Dublin for the first time last weekend. The delegates to the first-ever conference of Women’s Ordination Worldwide, or WOW, were mainly Catholics, but other denominations were also represented. Gathered in University College Dublin, the delegates, from 26 countries, made an impressive and colourful gathering, but the most significant part of the event was what happened behind the scenes.

First, there was the case of the would-be keynote speaker on the first night, Aruna Gnanadason of the World Council of Churches (WCC). In mid-May the organisers announced that Gnanadason would not be able to attend. The reason given was that the WCC didn’t want to interfere in the internal affairs of the Catholic Church. But one of the conference organisers, Soline Vatinel, told the Irish Times: The unofficial reason was that the Vatican said it would withdraw from commissions involving the WCC if Ms Gnanadason spoke at the conference. Some observers suggested that Orthodox Churches who are members of the WCC were also unhappy about her participation. In any case, her slot was instead filled by a Jamaican-born London vicar, the Revd Rose Hudson-Wilkin, while the text of Gnanadason’s undelivered speech was circulated to conference participants.
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Posted: July 11, 2001 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6618
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 11 juillet 2001 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6618
Catégorie : The Tablet


A priest called Ludmila

The underground Catholic Church in Czechoslovakia in Communist times ordained married men and a woman vicar-general. The aim was to bring the sacraments to those who otherwise would have to do without. Our Vienna correspondent has been reading a new biography of Ludmila Javorova.
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Posted: October 6, 2001 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6759
Categories: The TabletIn this article: ordination, women
Transmis : 6 octobre 2001 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6759
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : ordination, women


Where should the monarchy go now?

The celebrations of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee reached a high point this past week. The stunning success of the festivities shows that the British monarchy has climbed back into the affection of the people. What does it need to do to stay there? A Church of Scotland minister looks particularly at the monarch’s role as Supreme Governor of the Church of England and Defender of the Faith.
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Posted: June 8, 2002 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6732
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Anglican, Church of England, monarchy
Transmis : 8 juin 2002 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6732
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Anglican, Church of England, monarchy


Break this stained-glass ceiling

Last weekend, taking a brief respite between bouts of ‘Bread of Heaven’ and the national anthem in our exhaustive school end-of-term ceremonies, I dived into a paper and turned on the radio. Bad mistake. I was assaulted from two directions.

First, in a seemingly authoritative survey, a quarter of Church of England clergy and nearly one in five of the laity say that even now, eight years after the first women priests were ordained, there ‘should not be any women bishops, anywhere’. So the old horror of an oestrogenated ministry still lurks strongly within that Church, despite the shake-out when herds of outraged clergy and miffed laity defected to Rome over the issue (their worries about transubstantiation and papal infallibility strangely vanishing overnight in their greater worry about women in cassocks).
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Posted: July 6, 2002 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6620
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 6 juillet 2002 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6620
Catégorie : The Tablet


May They All Be One? But how?

I. When Jesus uttered the words ‘may they all be one’, they by no means represented a vision or a dream. Jesus said these words on the eve of his death. This was not the time for triumphal utopias. The Galilean spring, when the enthusiastic crowds overwhelmed him, was over. They no longer cried ‘Hosanna!’ but ‘Crucify him!’. Jesus was well aware of this, and predicted also that his disciples would not be one, and that they would be dispersed. What else could he do in this situation than to leave the future of his work in the hands of his Father? Thus, the words ‘may they all be one’ are a prayer, a prayer in a humanly perceived hopeless situation.
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Posted: May 17, 2003 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6663
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Catholic, Christian unity, ecumenism, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Walter Kasper
Transmis : 17 mai 2003 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6663
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, Christian unity, ecumenism, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Walter Kasper


Still waiting for goodwill

Next week Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity, is due to travel to Russia to meet the Patriarch in the highest-level visit by Vatican officials in four years. The aim of the five-day trip (due to start on Monday) is to improve relations between Rome and Moscow, which are at their lowest point since before the Second Vatican Council. Two years ago a visit by the cardinal was cancelled by the Moscow Patriarchate, outraged by what it described as aggressive Catholic missionary activity in its “canonical territory”.
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Posted: February 14, 2004 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6709
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, ecumenism, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox, Walter Kasper
Transmis : 14 février 2004 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6709
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, ecumenism, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox, Walter Kasper


A flawed vision of Zion

On a visit to Jerusalem in the mid-1990s, the then Archbishop of Canterbury, George Carey, said ruefully that so many Palestinian Christians were emigrating in despair from the West Bank that the Christian holy places would soon become Disneyland attractions rather than places of “living worship”.

Three and half years into a second intifada, the situation is still deteriorating. Only one branch of Christianity — Christian Zionism — feels comfortable in the Holy Land these days. The reason is simple: while the Catholic, Orthodox and Anglican Churches line up behind their embattled and dwindling Palestinian flocks to protest against Israel’s continued occupation of the West Bank and the expansion of settlements there, Christian Zionists stand shoulder to shoulder or even comfortably to the right of Likud and the Orthodox rabbis.

Among its demands are more Jewish settlements on the West Bank, the relocation of Palestinians to neighbouring Jordan and even the razing of the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa mosque to make way for the third Jewish Temple.
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Posted: April 8, 2004 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6672
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Christian Zionism, Israel, Sabeel
Transmis : 8 avril 2004 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6672
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Christian Zionism, Israel, Sabeel


A common tongue

On Monday 29 March I left Glasgow for the third Building Bridges seminar convened by the Archbishop of Canterbury and hosted by John J. DeGioia, president of Georgetown University in Washington. A few days earlier, the former Archbishop George Carey, the man responsible for hosting the first of these seminars at Lambeth Palace in 2002, had made front-page headlines after delivering a public lecture in which Islam and Muslims had come under severe criticism over a variety of political and theological issues. “It is sad to relate”, he said, “that no great invention has come for many hundred years from Muslim countries.” “During the past 500 hundred years,” he continued, “critical scholarship [in theology] has declined, leading to strong resistance to modernity.” Dr Carey added that moderate Muslims must “express strongly on behalf of the many millions of their co-religionists, their abhorrence of violence done in the name of Allah.” Much to the dismay of many Muslims and non-Muslims, in subsequent interviews, Dr Carey remained steadfast that he had not meant to offend the Muslim community.
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Posted: April 8, 2004 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=6674
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Archbishop of Canterbury, Christian, Christianity, George Carey, Islam, Rowan Williams
Transmis : 8 avril 2004 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=6674
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Archbishop of Canterbury, Christian, Christianity, George Carey, Islam, Rowan Williams


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