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Heresy and women priests

On 2 January, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith published a Notification, signed by the prefect, Cardinal Ratzinger, and by the secretary, Archbishop Bertone, and approved by Pope John Paul II, which declared that Fr Tissa Balasuriya OMI of Sri Lanka “has deviated from the integrity of the truth of the Catholic faith and, therefore, cannot be considered a Catholic theologian; moreover, he has incurred excommunication latae sententiae (can. 1364, par. 1)”. This canon states that an apostate from the faith, a heretic or a schismatic incurs an • automatic excommunication. The charge of “deviation from the truth of the faith” indicates that it is for heresy, rather than for apostasy or schism, that Fr Balasuriya has been excommunicated.
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Posted: Jan. 18, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6694
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, doctrine, ordination, women
Transmis : 18 janv. 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6694
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, doctrine, ordination, women


Journey across the desert

Thirty years ago, my father, Charles Davis, then a secular priest and considered by many the leading Catholic theologian in Britain, publicly denounced the Roman Catholic Church as corrupt, and left. It was a move which sent shock waves around the Catholic world. At the same time he married my mother, then Florence Henderson, a long-standing member of the international Catholic lay women’s organisation, the Grail. They had become friends through their joint work in the ecumenical movement in Britain. She followed him in his decision to leave the Church and together they went into a form of exile, which my father, in different contexts, has often referred to as the desert. It was in the desert that my brother and I were born and raised.
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Posted: Jan. 25, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6547
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Christian, Christianity, church, church reform, theology
Transmis : 25 janv. 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6547
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Christian, Christianity, church, church reform, theology


Liberating Mary

In the furore surrounding the ex-communication of Fr Tissa Balasuriya, very little has been said about the overall project of his book, Mary and Human Liberation. Beyond specific theological questions, Fr Balasuriya’s treatment of Mary touches on issues which go to the heart of the conflict between traditionalists and reformists which is dividing the Catholic Church today.

As in so many of Christianity’s decisive theological moments, the role of Mary is pivotal. The saying, “As Mary goes, so goes the Church,” is as true today as it was of the fifth century when the Council of Ephesus affirmed Christ’s divinity by declaring Mary Theotokos, or Godbearer.
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Posted: Mar. 8, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6554
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Catholic, feminist, liberation, Mary, theology
Transmis : 8 mars 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6554
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, feminist, liberation, Mary, theology


It won’t wash with women

Have any Catholic bishops in Ireland undergone equal-opportunities training? It is a serious question that I have asked before with a depressingly predictable answer. I could have asked the same question about the Pope and the entire Curia and been tolerably sure of the answer.

The fact that the answer is a resounding no is problematic today in a way that it was not even four or five years ago. The Western secular world has felt the impact of decades of serious equal opportunities debate, critique, research and legislation. Its momentum has gathered in Ireland as in many other countries, bringing all of us up a steep learning curve which has changed the face of education, employment, social policy, politics, human relationships and cultural perspectives. Some bastions of conservatism remain slumped at the bottom of the curve. Others climbed it reluctantly, some were pushed and yet others jumped it.
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Posted: Mar. 15, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6616
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 15 mars 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6616
Catégorie : The Tablet


Storm clouds in the East

Rome — and Poland — are buzzing with rumour, counter-rumour and denial: will Pope John Paul and Patriarch Alexis of the Russian Orthodox Church meet in Vienna on 21 June or won’t they? Perhaps by the time this article is published there will have been an announcement that puts paid to the rumours, but even an eventual negative provides a timely stimulus to consider relations between the Catholic and Orthodox Churches.

One argument against the likelihood of a meeting between the Pope and the Russian Patriarch is obvious: there has been no preparation. The Patriarch will be in Vienna on his way to the European Ecumenical Assembly in Graz and the Pope wants to meet him. The Pope has spoken prophetically about his desire to see the reunion of East and West, to reverse the basic division in Christendom of nearly a millennium, before the year 2000. Yet his health and the ticking of the clock make this an unattainable goal, at least in human terms.
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Posted: June 14, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6590
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, ecumenism, John Paul II, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox
Transmis : 14 juin 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6590
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, ecumenism, John Paul II, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox


The Great Converter

by Sue Gaisford for The Tablet. To some, he is the agent of England’s conversion to the True Faith, to others, a danger to the nation’s soul. At first sight Fr Michael Seed seems an unlikely candidate for either role. Sue Gaisford encounters the man behind the reputation. He is “a treacherous individual to the
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Posted: June 28, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6593
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 28 juin 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6593
Catégorie : The Tablet


Women priests: the unfinished story

For many Anglicans, the eleventh day of the eleventh month stirs memories of present as well as past conflicts: last Tuesday was the fifth anniversary of the General Synod’s vote in favour of women priests. By common consent the decision presaged the biggest upheaval in the Church of England since the Reformation, prompting 300 clergymen to resign their orders in protest at what they saw as a fracturing of the apostolic ministry. But in ordaining its women deacons in 1994 the Church gained nearly seven times as many new priests as it lost, and the new recruits are now serving at all levels of the hierarchy up to the rank of archdeacon. There appears to be ready agreement among most church people that the ordained ministry has been refreshed by “more open and collaborative styles of leadership”, and that women priests are accepted with enthusiasm by an evergrowing majority of congregations in consequence. “It’s an incarnational thing”, said one erstwhile sceptic. “When you see someone doing the job effectively, you’re quickly won over.”
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Posted: Nov. 15, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6595
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, ordination, women
Transmis : 15 nov. 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6595
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, ordination, women


The wound that will not heal

When Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople made a month-long tour of 16 cities in the United States in October and November, he was feted with honours at Washington’s Jesuit-run Georgetown University and greeted with splendour in Baltimore’s Catholic cathedral. As so often in inter-Church relations, however, the conciliatory declarations belied bitter realities.

Ironically, the sharp downturn in Catholic-Orthodox relations during the past six months came into the open after one of the Pope’s most impassioned appeals for Christian unity. The occasion John Paul II picked was a Eucharistic Congress held in May at Wroclaw in Poland. “In this our second millennium, when the unity of Christ’s disciples has suffered tragic divisions between East and West, prayer for the rediscovery of full unity is a special obligation”, the Pope said. “Can we bear joint and effective witness to Christ if we are not reconciled with one another? Can we be reconciled with one another without forgiving one another?”
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Posted: Dec. 6, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6598
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism, Orthodox
Transmis : 6 déc. 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6598
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism, Orthodox


A wife in the presbytery

A sign in the hallway of the presbytery at St Patrick’s, Middlesbrough, leaves some visitors open-mouthed if they are unaware of the priest’s marital status. Under the heading of Turnham House Rules it reads: If you drop it — pick it up. If you sleep in it — make it. If you open it — close it. If you empty it — fill it up. If it rings — answer it. If it cries — love it. The list is not addressed to a misbehaving curate, nor is it there for mere display. Its author, Fr Derek Turnham, and his wife Margaret have three children, the eldest of whom has recently started at university. It’s his first time away from us and so we’re really feeling the loss at the moment, Fr Turnham says, echoing the common view of parents in a similar situation.

Yet as he leads me towards the living-room, it is also clear that this is a Catholic presbytery like most others: austere, modestly furnished and free of ornaments apart from the odd icon or statue. Outside lies the scabrous wasteland that covers much of post-industrial north Middlesbrough. Fr Turnham anticipates my thoughts as we survey it, explaining that the diocese were frankly very glad to have us occupying this house, because it would almost certainly have been vandalised if it had lain empty any longer.
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Posted: Dec. 6, 1997 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6613
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 6 déc. 1997 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6613
Catégorie : The Tablet


No new dogmas please

As a child, a friend of mine used to be told by his nanny: Before you say anything, ask yourself: Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? The same three questions may well be asked about the current proposal to define Mary as Co-Redeemer.

Is it true? The answer to that question depends on the way in which we interpret the title Co-Redeemer, along with the related titles Mediator of All Graces and Advocate of the People of God. As a member of the Orthodox Church I have no objection to these three titles in themselves — provided that they are rightly understood.

Indeed, closely similar language occurs in the prayers and hymns used in the Christian East. With the greatest frequency in Orthodox worship we say to the Virgin Mary, Most Holy Mother of God, save us. In our invocations to other members of the Communion of Saints, including St John the Baptist, except on very rare occasions we never say more than … pray for us.
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Posted: Jan. 17, 1998 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6670
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, doctrine, ecumenism, Mary, Orthodox
Transmis : 17 janv. 1998 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6670
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, doctrine, ecumenism, Mary, Orthodox


Toward a Christian Theology of Religious Pluralism

Jacques Dupuis, <em>Toward a Christian Theology of Religious Pluralism</em>. Orbis Books, 1997. New ed. 2002. ISBN: 978-1570752643

More than 25 years ago in Northern India I first met Fr Dupuis. That meeting prefigured my contact with his remarkable book, and was also thoroughly physical. As he gunned his Yugoslavian motorcycle along narrow roads in the foothills of the Himalayas, I clung to him for dear life and prayed not to fall into the cavernous valleys that flanked our route to a high-altitude Buddhist monastery. After visiting the monks Dupuis roared off down another road to a self-help Tibetan refugee camp directed by the Dalai Lama’s sister-in-law and then to a mountaineering school run by the Sherpa Tensing who had conquered Mount Everest in 1953 with Sir Edmund Hillary. These visits shaped my first impressions of Jacques Dupuis as someone who wanted direct contact with other religious traditions and was certainly not content to learn about them simply by reading texts at his desk.
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Posted: Jan. 24, 1998 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6701
Categories: The TabletIn this article: dialogue, interfaith, salvation, theology
Transmis : 24 janv. 1998 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6701
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : dialogue, interfaith, salvation, theology


True and false Madonnas

In 1954, four years after the solemn definition of the doctrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into heaven, Pope Pius XII declared a Marian Year. With greater or lesser enthusiasm, Catholic Europe responded, and in my home town, on the east coast of Ireland, the response took spectacular form. The women were invited to donate jewellery, the men money, towards the creation of a solid-gold crown for the statue of the Blessed Virgin in our parish church. It was a poor community, yet the response to the appeal for the Virgin’s crown was remarkable, many of the women even donating their wedding rings. The statue, an insipid, life-sized plaster replica of Our Lady of Lourdes, white-robed, blue-sashed, smallbusted, neither a recognisably maternal nor even a very convincingly human image, was duly decorated with a crown which would have paid several times over for any one of the houses in which most of the donors lived.
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Posted: Feb. 6, 1999 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6691
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, doctrine, Mary
Transmis : 6 févr. 1999 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6691
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, doctrine, Mary


When women were deacons

So women deacons in the early Church had no part in the sacramental ministry, according to Cardinal Dario Castrillón Hoyos (The Tablet, 3/10 April, p. 500). His statement must have made the thousands of women deacons who faithfully served the Church in the past turn in their graves. For they were formidable women, if we are to go by the 28 tombstones on which some of them are commemorated. One was Athanasia in Delphi in the fifth century AD, who was ordained by Bishop Pantamianos. The stone carries a curse: May anyone who disturbs the tomb in which this honoured and blameless deaconess lies buried, receive the fate of Judas who betrayed our Lord Jesus Christ.

Fifty years ago, church historians and theologians alike routinely dismissed the women’s diaconate as obviously a historical sop to women, a blessing of some sort or just a minor order, for the simple reason that a sacramental ordination of women seemed a priori excluded. But the historical facts are becoming clearer by the day, and this position is now untenable.

From the outset we should realise what is at stake. If, as the records show, women were for many centuries admitted to the full diaconate which is now only imparted to men, then they did receive the sacrament of holy orders. For this sacrament has three levels: episcopacy, priesthood and diaconate. Anyone who receives any of the three is consecrated to the ministerial priesthood, as the Council of Trent defined it.

But were women ordained as real deacons — into a sacramental diaconate tied theologically to the Holy Spirit, to borrow Cardinal Castrillón Hoyos’s words?
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Posted: May 8, 1999 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6627
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 8 mai 1999 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6627
Catégorie : The Tablet


My wounded Church

In a very Anglican way, the Church of England sought to solve its internal crisis over women in the priesthood by legislation which made concessions to opponents. These provisions were remarkable — and, some would say, indefensible. One of them, the Episcopal Ministry Act of Synod 1993, allowing for alternative episcopal oversight, is now up for review, and under attack from the supporters of women priests, some of whom are campaigning for its repeal by 2002. But opponents, who believe their Catholic doctrine of the Church to be, if anything, more compromised by the concessions than by the ordinations themselves, are also looking for new solutions. Why are they still not satisfied, despite having been given so-called flying bishops and parochial autonomy? What are the issues at stake?

Let us not (for the moment) rake over the embers of the arguments that were carried on before the General Synod voted in 1992. Let women’s ordination be known, not by its roots but by its fruits. And by fruits I do not mean that experience of women’s ministry which it was confidently claimed would win every heart — no one has ever doubted the pastoral skills and sensitivity of women. I mean its theological and doctrinal consequences.
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Posted: July 31, 1999 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6629
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 31 juil. 1999 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6629
Catégorie : The Tablet


Bishops between a rock and a hard place

Catholics are permitted to support attempts to limit the evil aspects of an abortion law, says Pope John Paul in his encyclical Evangelium Vitae. In Germany, however, the moral complexities have made the Church draw back, which threatens to reduce its influence in society. A journalist on the weekly Rheinischer Merkur highlights the German bishops’ dilemma.
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Posted: Aug. 21, 1999 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6689
Categories: The TabletIn this article: abortion, Catholic, ethics, social policy, theology
Transmis : 21 aoüt 1999 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6689
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : abortion, Catholic, ethics, social policy, theology


The priesthood of Mary

With our short ecclesiastical memories, we have almost forgotten that in the run-up to its dogmatic definition in 1854, Mary’s Immaculate Conception was often justified on the grounds of her being a priest. Tradition frequently applied the words found in Hebrews 7:26 to her: “It is fitting that we should have such a high priest, holy, blameless, unstained, separated from sinners, exalted above the heavens.” The Benedictine prior Jacques Biroat wrote in 1666 that “Paul’s reasoning” in Hebrews 7:26 “is relevant to Christ’s mother. She shares in the priesthood of her son and is the origin of our reconciliation to God. Therefore, she had to be entirely innocent and separate from sinners. She had to be preserved from original sin.” Mary was immaculately conceived because she had to be a priest without stain. Mary has captured the Catholic imagination more than any other person except Jesus. Generation after generation has seen in her the highest reflection of saintliness and love. Catholics have been fond of Mary because she is Jesus’ own mother. They also respected her as his closest associate in redemption, as his first “priest”.
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Posted: Dec. 4, 1999 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6697
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, Mary, ordination, women
Transmis : 4 déc. 1999 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6697
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, Mary, ordination, women


An ecumenist gives thanks

It seems a far cry now from the mid-1950s when Roman Catholic ecumenism was in the main led by the Abbé Paul Couturier and other French pioneers, though a church historian could look further back to the Malines Conversations in Belgium between Catholics and Anglicans, and to the work of the Sword of the Spirit during the Second World War, when Cardinal Hinsley co- operated with William Temple, by then Archbishop of Canterbury. I well remember being involved with Oxford’s Catholics in the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity in its refashioned form — praying for the unity Christ willed for his Church by the means he chose. With some trepidation some of us ecumenical cognoscenti went to St Aloysius’ in St Giles, where we were invited to take part in Benediction. Well, there was no harm in entering in at the deep end, was there?
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Posted: Jan. 13, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6545
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: exchange of gifts, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU
Transmis : 13 janv. 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6545
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : exchange of gifts, spiritual ecumenism, WPCU


Ice curtain in the East

On 7 January, Russia’s Orthodox Church celebrated the two-thousandth anniversary of the birth of Christ. Thousands attended the Christmas liturgy in Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Saviour, triumphantly, and, many have averred, tastelessly, restored to the city’s skyline more than 60 years after Stalin ordered its obliteration from it. Live coverage of the event was marred, however, when Patriarch Alexis II arrived more than an hour late, delayed by his participation in the day’s informal meetings between President Putin and the German Chancellor, Gerhard Schröder.

As the television cameras panned in on the massed faithful awaiting their Patriarch, they picked out the emerald robes of seemingly the most senior cleric in attendance — Mufti Talgat Tadzhuddin, head of Russia’s Central Spiritual Directorate of Muslims. For the third year running, the chief representative of Russia’s Roman Catholics, Tadeusz Kondrusiewicz, had not been invited.
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Posted: Jan. 27, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6557
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Catholic, Orthodox, Russian, Ukraine
Transmis : 27 janv. 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6557
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, Orthodox, Russian, Ukraine


The Pope steps into a Greek drama

Pope John Paul is to make a brief visit to Athens in May. Many of the Greek Orthodox clergy and the monks of Athos are up in arms. Could this nevertheless turn out to be a breaking of the ice which has lasted since the Western and Eastern Church split in 1054? An Assumptionist priest who was formerly stationed in Athens looks at the tensions.
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Posted: Mar. 24, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6730
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, John Paul II, Orthodox
Transmis : 24 mars 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6730
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, John Paul II, Orthodox


It’s time we listened

One of the subtleties of Shakespeare’s As You Like It is the existence of layers of sexual ambiguity implied in its original performance: a boy-actor played the part of a young woman disguised as a young man who at one point is pretending to be a girl. I was put in mind of these layers of meaning when I read The Eucharist: sacrament of unity (ESU), the Church of England’s highly courteous and careful response to the British and Irish bishops’ 1998 teaching document on eucharistic doctrine and sharing entitled One Bread One Body (OBOB). There is of course one vitally important difference: whereas the play’s layers form the stages in a dialectic, i.e. an interactive process, of ambiguity, the theological document offers a dialectic of clarification, which provides a model of what is involved in ecumenical reception.
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Posted: Mar. 31, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6537
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Christian unity, ecumenism
Transmis : 31 mars 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6537
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Christian unity, ecumenism


Cardinals in conflict

The recent elevation of 44 new cardinals may have seemed to show that for the Catholic Church, it was business as usual. In reality the ceremony marked a radical break. For this first consistory of the new millennium was at the same time a farewell ceremony for a whole era — the era of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger. The eminent prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), that capable and controversial guardian of Roman Catholic orthodoxy, had enjoyed a monopoly of spiritual power under papal primacy. Now that was challenged. The consistory was both an individual personal drama and an institutional setback to Roman centralism.
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Posted: Apr. 28, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6706
Categories: The TabletIn this article: church, ecclesiology, Joseph Ratzinger, Second Vatican Council, theology, Walter Kasper
Transmis : 28 avril 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6706
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : church, ecclesiology, Joseph Ratzinger, Second Vatican Council, theology, Walter Kasper


The Pope and the Mufti

Pope John Paul, who celebrated his eighty-first birthday this week, is a man in a hurry. In the twilight days of his long papacy, he is expanding the perspective of his by now traditional pastoral visits around the world and he is laying down markers for the future. These concern the future relations of the Roman Catholic Church both with the separated Orthodox Christian Churches, and with the other monotheistic religions, Islam and Judaism.

Hence the first-ever visit this month by a pope to a mosque, the impressive Great Umayyad Mosque in Damascus. Twenty years ago it would have been inconceivable that a pope from Rome should remove his shoes, put on white slippers and traverse one of the great Holy Places of Islam for a meeting with the Grand Mufti and other clerics in the courtyard of the mosque.
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Posted: May 19, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6735
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Christian, Christianity, Islam, John Paul II, Orthodox
Transmis : 19 mai 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6735
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Christian, Christianity, Islam, John Paul II, Orthodox


Women raise their voices

An organisation bringing together campaigners from all over the world in favour of ordaining women met in Dublin for the first time last weekend. The delegates to the first-ever conference of Women’s Ordination Worldwide, or WOW, were mainly Catholics, but other denominations were also represented. Gathered in University College Dublin, the delegates, from 26 countries, made an impressive and colourful gathering, but the most significant part of the event was what happened behind the scenes.

First, there was the case of the would-be keynote speaker on the first night, Aruna Gnanadason of the World Council of Churches (WCC). In mid-May the organisers announced that Gnanadason would not be able to attend. The reason given was that the WCC didn’t want to interfere in the internal affairs of the Catholic Church. But one of the conference organisers, Soline Vatinel, told the Irish Times: The unofficial reason was that the Vatican said it would withdraw from commissions involving the WCC if Ms Gnanadason spoke at the conference. Some observers suggested that Orthodox Churches who are members of the WCC were also unhappy about her participation. In any case, her slot was instead filled by a Jamaican-born London vicar, the Revd Rose Hudson-Wilkin, while the text of Gnanadason’s undelivered speech was circulated to conference participants.
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Posted: July 11, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6618
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 11 juil. 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6618
Catégorie : The Tablet


A priest called Ludmila

The underground Catholic Church in Czechoslovakia in Communist times ordained married men and a woman vicar-general. The aim was to bring the sacraments to those who otherwise would have to do without. Our Vienna correspondent has been reading a new biography of Ludmila Javorova.
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Posted: Oct. 6, 2001 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6759
Categories: The TabletIn this article: ordination, women
Transmis : 6 oct. 2001 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6759
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : ordination, women


Where should the monarchy go now?

The celebrations of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee reached a high point this past week. The stunning success of the festivities shows that the British monarchy has climbed back into the affection of the people. What does it need to do to stay there? A Church of Scotland minister looks particularly at the monarch’s role as Supreme Governor of the Church of England and Defender of the Faith.
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Posted: June 8, 2002 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6732
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Anglican, Church of England, monarchy
Transmis : 8 juin 2002 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6732
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Anglican, Church of England, monarchy


Break this stained-glass ceiling

Last weekend, taking a brief respite between bouts of ‘Bread of Heaven’ and the national anthem in our exhaustive school end-of-term ceremonies, I dived into a paper and turned on the radio. Bad mistake. I was assaulted from two directions.

First, in a seemingly authoritative survey, a quarter of Church of England clergy and nearly one in five of the laity say that even now, eight years after the first women priests were ordained, there ‘should not be any women bishops, anywhere’. So the old horror of an oestrogenated ministry still lurks strongly within that Church, despite the shake-out when herds of outraged clergy and miffed laity defected to Rome over the issue (their worries about transubstantiation and papal infallibility strangely vanishing overnight in their greater worry about women in cassocks).
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Posted: July 6, 2002 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6620
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 6 juil. 2002 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6620
Catégorie : The Tablet


May They All Be One? But how?

I. When Jesus uttered the words ‘may they all be one’, they by no means represented a vision or a dream. Jesus said these words on the eve of his death. This was not the time for triumphal utopias. The Galilean spring, when the enthusiastic crowds overwhelmed him, was over. They no longer cried ‘Hosanna!’ but ‘Crucify him!’. Jesus was well aware of this, and predicted also that his disciples would not be one, and that they would be dispersed. What else could he do in this situation than to leave the future of his work in the hands of his Father? Thus, the words ‘may they all be one’ are a prayer, a prayer in a humanly perceived hopeless situation.
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Posted: May 17, 2003 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6663
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Catholic, Christian unity, ecumenism, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Walter Kasper
Transmis : 17 mai 2003 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6663
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, Christian unity, ecumenism, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Walter Kasper


Still waiting for goodwill

Next week Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity, is due to travel to Russia to meet the Patriarch in the highest-level visit by Vatican officials in four years. The aim of the five-day trip (due to start on Monday) is to improve relations between Rome and Moscow, which are at their lowest point since before the Second Vatican Council. Two years ago a visit by the cardinal was cancelled by the Moscow Patriarchate, outraged by what it described as aggressive Catholic missionary activity in its “canonical territory”.
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Posted: Feb. 14, 2004 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6709
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, ecumenism, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox, Walter Kasper
Transmis : 14 févr. 2004 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6709
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, ecumenism, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox, Walter Kasper


A flawed vision of Zion

On a visit to Jerusalem in the mid-1990s, the then Archbishop of Canterbury, George Carey, said ruefully that so many Palestinian Christians were emigrating in despair from the West Bank that the Christian holy places would soon become Disneyland attractions rather than places of “living worship”.

Three and half years into a second intifada, the situation is still deteriorating. Only one branch of Christianity — Christian Zionism — feels comfortable in the Holy Land these days. The reason is simple: while the Catholic, Orthodox and Anglican Churches line up behind their embattled and dwindling Palestinian flocks to protest against Israel’s continued occupation of the West Bank and the expansion of settlements there, Christian Zionists stand shoulder to shoulder or even comfortably to the right of Likud and the Orthodox rabbis.

Among its demands are more Jewish settlements on the West Bank, the relocation of Palestinians to neighbouring Jordan and even the razing of the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa mosque to make way for the third Jewish Temple.
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Posted: Apr. 8, 2004 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6672
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Christian Zionism, Israel, Sabeel
Transmis : 8 avril 2004 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6672
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Christian Zionism, Israel, Sabeel


A common tongue

On Monday 29 March I left Glasgow for the third Building Bridges seminar convened by the Archbishop of Canterbury and hosted by John J. DeGioia, president of Georgetown University in Washington. A few days earlier, the former Archbishop George Carey, the man responsible for hosting the first of these seminars at Lambeth Palace in 2002, had made front-page headlines after delivering a public lecture in which Islam and Muslims had come under severe criticism over a variety of political and theological issues. “It is sad to relate”, he said, “that no great invention has come for many hundred years from Muslim countries.” “During the past 500 hundred years,” he continued, “critical scholarship [in theology] has declined, leading to strong resistance to modernity.” Dr Carey added that moderate Muslims must “express strongly on behalf of the many millions of their co-religionists, their abhorrence of violence done in the name of Allah.” Much to the dismay of many Muslims and non-Muslims, in subsequent interviews, Dr Carey remained steadfast that he had not meant to offend the Muslim community.
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Posted: Apr. 8, 2004 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6674
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Archbishop of Canterbury, Christian, Christianity, George Carey, Islam, Rowan Williams
Transmis : 8 avril 2004 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6674
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Archbishop of Canterbury, Christian, Christianity, George Carey, Islam, Rowan Williams


Feminism, Vatican-style

Rome’s new document on men and women shows that feminists and the Church have more in common than perhaps either realises, but Catholic theology has yet to describe the sacramental nature of women.
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Posted: Aug. 7, 2004 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6756
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, Christian feminism, Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, theological anthropology, theology, women
Transmis : 7 aoüt 2004 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6756
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, Christian feminism, Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, theological anthropology, theology, women


Unity on a knife edge

The Christian Churches face a crisis in ecumenism. Before rapprochement with other faiths becomes possible, they must overcome their own differences

There are four areas which are crucial to Christianity within the next 20 years and which have to be faced by all Christians. They will certainly be among the main challenges facing the next pope.

The first is the de-christianisation of Europe. How extraordinary that in the space of 50 years the secularist culture of Europe should have gained such sway, especially at a time when, around the world, the Enlightenment prediction that religion would become merely a private affair seems to have been so misplaced. The rise of an assertive Islam, with all its huge challenges, speaks for itself, as does the new popularity of religious practice in the former Soviet Union. The crucial 2 per cent or 3 per cent margin which handed victory to President Bush is being attributed to the newly galvanised ranks of evangelical Christians in the United States. In Africa, Asia and Latin America, the Churches are expanding fast. Even in our old, tired Europe, religious belief is exerting a new fascination among the young, as is evident in the increased take-up of RE at A-level and theology at university.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: Nov. 20, 2004 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6676
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Christian unity, ecumenism, Second Vatican Council
Transmis : 20 nov. 2004 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6676
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Christian unity, ecumenism, Second Vatican Council


Paradox at the heart of the Mass

Communion is sign of unity, but often it leaves people feeling excluded, on the outside of the community of the faithful. In the fifth of our series, a Benedictine monk seeks a theological basis for a pastoral re-examination of the problem
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Posted: Mar. 12, 2005 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6752
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, Christian unity, eucharist, sacramental sharing
Transmis : 12 mars 2005 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6752
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, Christian unity, eucharist, sacramental sharing


The other half of the Church

For all the Vatican’s increasingly enlightened view of women’s role in the world, prejudice still prevents many from participating fully within Catholicism. Changing that needs to be high on the next pope’s agenda

Last week I stood in a pew at Westminster Cathedral watching the procession to the altar for Solemn Vespers for Pope John Paul II. It was an impressive, dignified sight, with Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, the bishops of Westminster diocese, priests, ecumenical and interfaith guests, and the choir gathering for a service to commemorate John Paul II. Both the procession and the service could be perceived as a metaphor for the Church and its relationship with women. The voice of a woman was heard just once, reading a bidding prayer and the reader, a cleric from another denomination, was one of just two females in the procession. The other was a young teenage altar server. The congregation, however, was different: I would estimate that more than half the people attending were women.
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Posted: Apr. 16, 2005 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6622
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 16 avril 2005 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6622
Catégorie : The Tablet


The Anglican contributor’s view

Some of the liveliest debates at ARCIC meetings have been over titles. We worked together for five years on the “Mary document”, so we all have strong feelings about the progress we made and the best way to present it. “Put Mary in the title”, said one member, “and it will fly off the shelves.” “Put grace and hope in the title”, said another, “because that’s how we have approached the two Marian dogmas.” “Put Christ in the title,” we all agreed, because again and again we reminded each other that the Church is interested in Mary because she is the mother of the Lord.

ARCIC does not set its own agenda. We worked on Mary because we were asked for “a study of Mary in the life and doctrine of the Church” and because of the acknowledged differences between our two communions over Mariological teaching.
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Posted: May 21, 2005 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6678
Categories: The TabletIn this article: ARCIC, Christian unity, dialogue, ecumenism, Mary
Transmis : 21 mai 2005 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6678
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : ARCIC, Christian unity, dialogue, ecumenism, Mary


The Catholic contributor’s view

During Holy Weeek, one Anglican member of ARCIC sent the rest of us the poem, “Good Friday Falls on Lady Day” via email. The poet, G. Studdert Kennedy, also an Anglican, wrote:

She claims no crown from Christ apart Who gave God life and limb She only claims a broken heart Because of Him.

I knew that the Feast of the Annunciation of the Lord would coincide with Good Friday this year, but I did not know the poem, and I was touched to receive it. In a way, this captures something special about the process of producing “Mary: Grace and Hope in Christ”.
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Posted: May 21, 2005 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6681
Categories: The TabletIn this article: ARCIC, dialogue, ecumenism, Mary
Transmis : 21 mai 2005 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6681
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : ARCIC, dialogue, ecumenism, Mary


Marian accord raises unity hopes

When Catholics hold interfaith dialogue with Muslims, one of the first topics to be discussed is the veneration given to the Virgin Mary in the two traditions. Teaching about Mary is seen as something that unites, rather than divides Catholicism and Islam; yet among Christians, the practices of Marian doctrine and devotion have generally been read as clear indicators of the differences between Catholics and Protestants. They have also, on occasion, signified the differences even between Catholics and Orthodox.

It is only fairly recently, therefore, that ecumenical dialogue groups have arrived at this touchy subject. The most recent statement from the ARCIC (Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission), “Mary: Grace and Hope in Christ” – which was ready many months ago, but had been awaiting approval from Rome before it could be published – has therefore been anticipated with bated breath.
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Posted: May 21, 2005 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6683
Categories: The TabletIn this article: ARCIC, dialogue, ecumenism, Mary
Transmis : 21 mai 2005 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6683
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : ARCIC, dialogue, ecumenism, Mary


A man of peace cut down

The murder this week of Brother Roger Schutz, founder of the Taizé community, shocked Christians everywhere. But his vision will still draw pilgrims.

The success story of this Protestant “monastery” is the unlikely story of a determined man, Roger Schutz, and of his impossible dream: the reconciliation of Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox Christians. How did his little community of companions, both Protestant and Catholic, who settled in a small village in Burgundy in 1940, become the European ecumenical pastoral youth centre which it is today, visited by 6,000 adolescents each week and 100,000 pilgrims every year, from every part of the world? The programme is austere – worship three times a day in the hangar-like church (built by young volunteers), Bible study and discussion groups – and the lifestyle spartan – sleeping rough in tents or barracks, simple food hastily consumed after queuing at length to be served.
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Posted: Aug. 20, 2005 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6749
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Taizé
Transmis : 20 aoüt 2005 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6749
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Taizé


A Pope for all Christians

by Bishop Michael Nazir-Ali for The Tablet. Pope John Paul II has invited leaders and theologians of other Churches to help him in seeking new forms for the papal ministry. In this article the Bishop of Rochester makes a contribution from the Anglican Communion’s point of view. As I write, conversations are taking place in
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Posted: June 12, 2006 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6550
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Anglican, Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism, papacy, petrine ministry
Transmis : 12 juin 2006 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6550
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Anglican, Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism, papacy, petrine ministry


Winds of change

Rather than be split by a much-trumpeted schism,the Anglican Communion emerged from its meeting in Tanzania this week as a new kind of twenty-first century Church, reflecting changes in ecclesial and geopolitical power

Will the Anglican Communion survive? Before the Primates’ Meeting in Africa this week there was much discussion of schism, and an atmosphere of crisis prevailed. At the heart of the problem is how Anglicans reconcile the value they place on diocesan and provincial structure of autonomy at the national level with the legitimacy given to a comprehensive range of practices and positions with the bonds of ecclesial communion that allow the Communion coherence as one effective, united, interdependent worldwide body of Christians. Given that, what does the Anglican Communion mean? Is it a fellowship of independent national churches with historical roots in the Church of England that worship through a provincial expression of the Book of Common Prayer, or is it a hierarchical system with the Archbishop of Canterbury at the top as a sort of mini-Pope?
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Posted: Feb. 24, 2007 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6714
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Anglican Communion, Christian unity, human sexuality, Rowan Williams
Transmis : 24 févr. 2007 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6714
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Anglican Communion, Christian unity, human sexuality, Rowan Williams


Through many dangers,toils and snares …

When Catholic cardinals meet in conclave they tend to do so under the stern eye of God in the Sistine Chapel. Anglican primates are different; this past week they have been meeting privately in the agreeable surroundings of a beach-front hotel overlooking the shimmering Indian Ocean just outside Dar es Salaam. Where the cardinals have Swiss Guards to protect them, the Anglicans have enjoyed what we journalists took to calling satirically the ring of steel: a group of young askari cadets, dressed in white shirts and black berets, who nervously fingered their truncheons when anyone approached.
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Posted: Feb. 24, 2007 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6712
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Anglican Communion, Christian unity, human sexuality, Rowan Williams
Transmis : 24 févr. 2007 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6712
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Anglican Communion, Christian unity, human sexuality, Rowan Williams


Women under fire

Film of captured female sailor Faye Turney shown on Iranian television has highlighted concerns about the increasing number of women forces personnel at risk of abuse and exploitation by an enemy. But they are here to stay

The headlines said it all: warrior, mother, pawn. They were referring to the plight of Leading Seaman Faye Turney, the 26-year-old ship’s boat crewman from the frigate HMS Cornwall, seized by Iranian Revolutionary Guards in the upper Gulf on 23 March along with seven Royal Marines and seven fellow sailors.

Manipulating Faye Turney seems to be central to the tactics of her captors, whoever they really are in the baffling mosaic of intrigue and loyalties in the Revolutionary Guard and the dwindling circle of militant student followers of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian President. They certainly appear to be more disturbed over her role as a woman serving on operations with a British man-o’-war than that of her commanders.
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Posted: Apr. 7, 2007 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6625
Categories: The Tablet
Transmis : 7 avril 2007 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6625
Catégorie : The Tablet


No common language yet

A hundred years on from the establishing of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, how much further forward are we? And what exactly are we praying for during this week of prayer? On the whole, it’s become a fixture for most “mainstream” denominations, a few days when the more enthusiastic or more biddable members of the congregation turn up to someone else’s church for a well-mannered but often rather lukewarm joint service or two, or perhaps for a talk by a prominent local leader.

The aspiration that we end up relating better with each other, or even that we end up more willing to engage in witness and work together is entirely worthy, and is probably widely fulfilled. But are we praying for anything more than this?

For some people, the answer is clearly “no”. To look beyond this fostering of local goodwill, they would say, is always in danger of slipping towards the yearning for some universal institution with clear central control – at worst, a Pullmanesque Magisterium, some people’s nightmare of Roman Catholicism.
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Posted: Dec. 22, 2007 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6686
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Archbishop of Canterbury, Christian unity, Rowan Williams, WPCU
Transmis : 22 déc. 2007 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6686
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Archbishop of Canterbury, Christian unity, Rowan Williams, WPCU


Christian-Jewish relations ‘difficult’

Christian-Jewish relations ‘difficult’

[The Tablet • Christa Pongratz-Lippitt] Cardinal Walter Kasper this week admitted that Christian-Jewish relations were going through a difficult period following the publication of the revised Good Friday Prayer for the Tridentine Rite, writes Christa Pongratz-Lippitt. Cardinal Kasper, president of the Commission for Religious Relations with the Jews, was speaking in an interview with the Ulm-based daily Südwest-Presse on the eve of the Katholikentag in Osnabrück. Several prominent German Jews will not be attending that event on account of the prayer.

Admitting the current tensions in Catholic-Jewish relations in Germany, Cardinal Kasper said: “Germany is, of course, particularly sensitive for historical reasons. This is a difficult period but I think we will be able to get back to the level of dialogue we have had up to now – at least that is what we would like to achieve.”

Asked why a German Pope “of all people” had been so “insensitive to German history” Cardinal Kasper said Pope Benedict “wanted to do something positive. He wanted to improve a prayer that the Jews found offensive and he succeeded. But that did not go quite as far as people wanted or expected. The Pope showed his good will as his unplanned visit to a synagogue in the US shows. This was seen as something most positive in America. In Germany things are different but we are doing all we can to overcome the difficulties.”

Asked why Pope Paul VI’s Good Friday Prayer for the Jews had not been adopted for the Tridentine Mass, Cardinal Kasper replied, “The present Pope wanted the language of the old prayer kept while improving the contents. He did not want to introduce a new liturgical form into the old, extraordinary form.”
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Posted: May 24, 2008 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=462
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Judaism
Transmis : 24 mai 2008 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=462
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Judaism


Two faiths, one challenge

[The Tablet] The symbolism of next week’s inaugural meeting of the Catholic-Muslim Forum at the Vatican is likely to be as important as what is actually said. The public perception of religion is that it leads to trouble, especially between one religious or ethnic group and another. Indeed, in Iraq and Pakistan, Christians have had reason to fear for their lives from extremist Muslims who are, it must be stressed, acting in defiance of the teachings of their own faith. In Western Europe many Muslims have experienced discrimination and prejudice, and occasionally violence, not so much from anti-Islamic ideology as from sheer bigotry and racism. Yet in the Vatican next week leaders of the two faiths will stand side by side in mutual respect. One of them will be Pope Benedict XVI.

• The complete editorial published in The Tablet, November 1, 2008, is available online.
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Posted: Nov. 1, 2008 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=516
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Islam
Transmis : 1 nov. 2008 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=516
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Islam


Catholics and Muslims find common ground in Rome

Catholics and Muslims find common ground in Rome

[The Tablet] The first meeting of the Catholic-Muslim Forum of scholars and religious leaders has ended in a joint declaration saying religious minorities have a right to “practise their faith in private and public” and to have their own houses of worship.

Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, president of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, ranked this as the most important of the 15 points agreed with delegates from the Common Word project, a dialogue initiative launched last year by 138 Islamic leaders from the Middle East, Asia, Africa and Western countries. The declaration also called for respect for personal “choices in matters of conscience and religion,” which could apply to the thorny question of conversion from Islam, which the delegates discussed briefly but did not seek consensus on.

• See the complete article from The Tablet, November 15, 2008 at www.thetablet.co.uk/article/12282
• See the Final Declaration of the Catholic-Muslim Forum at ecumenism.net/archive/news/2008_11.htm#000787
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Posted: Nov. 15, 2008 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=521
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, Islam
Transmis : 15 nov. 2008 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=521
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, Islam


Benedict’s high risk strategy

The Pope has described it as an act of paternal mercy. But while the lifting of the excommunication of rebel Lefebvrist bishops has been praised by arch-traditionalists, it has shocked many Catholics and members of other faiths, especially Jews. The Tablet's Robert Mickens tracks the reasons for the turnaround and its consequences

It came during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity and on the eve of the fiftieth anniversary of Pope John XXIII’s announcement of the Second Vatican Council – news that Pope Benedict had decreed that the “Lefebvrists”, the four bishops excommunicated for disobedience and who have never fully accepted the Council, could return to the Church.

The Pope instructed the Congregation for Bishops to “remit” the excommunications of four leaders of the schismatic Society of St Pius X (SSPX) otherwise known as Lefebvrists. The four men — Bernard Fellay, Bernard Tissier de Mallerais, Richard Williamson and Alfonso del Gallareta — incurred automatic (latae sententiae) excommunication in June 1988 when they were illicitly ordained bishops by renegade Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre (d. 1991), who founded the SSPX in 1970 and the Seminary of Ecône in south-west Switzerland.
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Posted: Jan. 31, 2009 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6574
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Society of St. Pius X
Transmis : 31 janv. 2009 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6574
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Society of St. Pius X


Vatican attacks Quebec’s compulsory Religious Education course

The head of the Vatican’s education office has described the religious education curriculum introduced by the government of Quebec as bordering on “anti-Catholic”.

Cardinal Zenon Grocholewski, the Prefect of the Congregation for Catholic Education, stepped into the row over religious education, which has divided the Canadian province, when he criticised the Ethics and Religious Culture programme. It was implemented last September and has replaced all other RE curricula in the province’s state schools and Protestant and Catholic schools.

Eighty-two per cent of Quebec’s 7.5 million population are at least nominally Catholic, and boycotts of the course are occurring throughout the province. Cardinal Grocholewski said: “Talking in the same way about all religions is almost like an anti-Catholic education, because this creates a certain relativism.” He said this approach could ultimately be anti-religious, since young people are left with the impression that each faith is a fictional narrative. Speaking to the Zenit news agency in Rome, he also said that teaching all religions equally “violates the right of parents to educate their own children according to their own religion”.

Some Quebec schools have suspended pupils who take part in the boycotts. Loyola High School, a private Jesuit school in Montreal, is suing the province after its request that it be exempted from teaching the programme because it was “contrary to its faith mission” was denied.

• Read the complete news article in The Tablet, February 28, 2009
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Posted: Feb. 27, 2009 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=559
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic
Transmis : 27 févr. 2009 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=559
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic


Benedict’s address at Lambeth Palace

You have spoken, Your Grace, of the historic meeting that took place, almost thirty years ago, between two of our predecessors – Pope John Paul the Second and Archbishop Robert Runcie – in Canterbury Cathedral. There, in the very place where Saint Thomas of Canterbury bore witness to Christ by the shedding of his blood, they prayed together for the gift of unity among the followers of Christ. We continue today to pray for that gift, knowing that the unity Christ willed for his disciples will only come about in answer to prayer, through the action of the Holy Spirit, who ceaselessly renews the Church and guides her into the fullness of truth.
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Posted: Sept. 17, 2010 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6726
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Anglican, Benedict XVI, Catholic, Church of England, Rowan Williams
Transmis : 17 sept. 2010 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6726
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Anglican, Benedict XVI, Catholic, Church of England, Rowan Williams


Pope demands more emphasis on ecumenism in German visit

by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt for The Tablet Pope Benedict XVI has intervened personally to demand more time for ecumenical talks with the Protestant Churches when he visits Germany in September. In a highly unusual move he has written directly to the leader of the Protestant Churches, Chairman Nikolaus Schneider, expressing dissatisfaction with the brevity of the
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Posted: Mar. 26, 2011 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6740
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Benedict XVI, Catholic, ecumenism, Lutheran
Transmis : 26 mars 2011 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6740
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Benedict XVI, Catholic, ecumenism, Lutheran


Koch says joint ‘admission of guilt’ for Reformation needed

The joint commemoration of the Reformation by Catholics and Lutherans could begin with an admission of guilt by both sides, the president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Cardinal Kurt Koch, said in an interview last week. The Vatican and the Lutheran World Federation are planning a joint declaration on the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017. “Without joint recollection, joint purification and without an admission of guilt on both sides, an honest commemoration will not be possible,” Cardinal Koch told the Austrian Catholic Press Agency.
… Read more » … lire la suite »

Posted: Sept. 3, 2011 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6737
Categories: The TabletIn this article: 2017, Catholic, ecumenism, Kurt Koch, Lutheran World Federation, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Reformation
Transmis : 3 sept. 2011 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6737
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : 2017, Catholic, ecumenism, Kurt Koch, Lutheran World Federation, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Reformation


Benedict XVI meets Lutheran leaders at the Augustinerkloster, Erfurt

As the Bishop of Rome, it is deeply moving for me to be meeting you here in the ancient Augustinian convent in Erfurt. As we have just heard, this is where Luther studied theology. This is where he was ordained a priest. Against his father’s wishes, he did not continue the study of Law, but instead he studied theology and set off on the path towards priesthood in the Order of Saint Augustine. And on this path, he was not simply concerned with this or that. What constantly exercised him was the question of God, the deep passion and driving force of his whole life’s journey. “How do I receive the grace of God?”: this question struck him in the heart and lay at the foundation of all his theological searching and inner struggle. For Luther theology was no mere academic pursuit, but the struggle for oneself, which in turn was a struggle for and with God.
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Posted: Sept. 23, 2011 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6717
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Benedict XVI, Catholic, ecumenism, Lutheran, Martin Luther
Transmis : 23 sept. 2011 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6717
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Benedict XVI, Catholic, ecumenism, Lutheran, Martin Luther


Benedict’s balancing act

Pope Benedict XVI’s third visit to Germany last week was billed as the 84-year-old pontiff’s latest effort to help convince people in highly secularised Europe that their society would be better and more human if God were at its centre. He won high praise for a deeply philosophical paper given to the Bundestag in Berlin on the foundations for a free state of law (see page 10). In that address, he said it was “urgent” to start a “public debate” on the necessity of retrieving the natural law tradition in developing legislation. As with his speech at Westminster Hall a year ago, the Pope was hailed for reaching across the political and religious divide of Germany’s parliament and its intellectual class.
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Posted: Oct. 1, 2011 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6742
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Benedict XVI, Society of St. Pius X
Transmis : 1 oct. 2011 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6742
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Benedict XVI, Society of St. Pius X


Pope ‘rehabilitated Luther’ during visit to eastern Germany

Jonathan Luxmoore and Christa Pongratz-Lippitt, The Tablet The head of the German Church’s Ecumenical Commission has said that he believes the Pope “rehabilitated” the reformer, Martin Luther, during his visit to the country last month, write Jonathan Luxmoore and Christa Pongratz-Lippitt. Speaking on 23 September to the council of the Evangelische Kirche in Deutschland, in
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Posted: Oct. 8, 2011 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6746
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Benedict XVI, Catholic, ecumenism, Lutheran, Martin Luther
Transmis : 8 oct. 2011 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6746
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Benedict XVI, Catholic, ecumenism, Lutheran, Martin Luther


Lutheran leader defends the Pope

by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt, The Tablet Lutheran Bishop Johannes Friedrich has said that the Pope’s visit to the Augustinian monastery at Erfurt on his visit to Germany last year “cannot be rated highly enough”. The former Bishop of Bavaria was writing in the German Protestant monthly Chrismon about the papal visit to Germany’s Protestant heartland last
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Posted: Jan. 28, 2012 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=6744
Categories: The TabletIn this article: 2017, Benedict XVI, Catholic, Lutheran, Reformation, Walter Kasper
Transmis : 28 janv. 2012 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=6744
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : 2017, Benedict XVI, Catholic, Lutheran, Reformation, Walter Kasper


Full unity is the ultimate aim of ecumenism, says Longley

Christopher Lamb, The Tablet

The Archbishop of Birmingham has said he understands those frustrated with ecumenical dialogue but stressed the long term aim is “full visible unity”. Archbishop Bernard Longley was speaking to The Tablet days before members of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) gathered for their latest round of meetings in Hong Kong, which was due to start on Friday.
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Posted: May 3, 2012 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=2167
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism
Transmis : 3 mai 2012 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=2167
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism


My brother Andrew: Relations between the Churches of East and West

Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople and Pope Francis greet each other at the inaugural Mass for Pope Francis

Pope Francis’ reference to himself as the ‘Bishop of Rome’ was music to the ears of Orthodox leaders for whom the question of papal primacy has long been a problem for reunion. Their attendance at the new Pope’s inaugural Mass was a sign of their hopes for closer communion. A statement from the patriarchate explained Bartholomew’s decision to attend Pope Francis’ inauguration personally: the need for “a profoundly bold step … that could have lasting significance”. It is the first time the Bishop of Constantinople has attended the inauguration of the Bishop of Rome ever, let alone since the great schism of 1054. According to the patriarchate ­website: “after such a long division … authentic reunion will require courage, leadership and humility. Given Pope Francis’ well-­documented work for social justice and his insistence that globalisation is detrimental to the poor … the Orthodox and the Roman Catholic traditions have a renewed opportunity to work collectively on issues of mutual concern … But such work requires a first step and it would appear as though Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew is willing to take such a step.” In one of those seemingly informal but resonant gestures that we are beginning to expect from Francis, the response was immediate and commensurate. The successor of Peter greeted the successor of the other Galilean fisherman as “my brother Andrew”.
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Posted: Mar. 30, 2013 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=3515
Categories: Opinion, The TabletIn this article: Bartholomew I, Christian unity, dialogue, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, ecumenism, Orthodox, patriarch
Transmis : 30 mars 2013 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=3515
Catégorie : Opinion, The TabletDans cet article : Bartholomew I, Christian unity, dialogue, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, ecumenism, Orthodox, patriarch


Long divisions that plague the Church

Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople and Pope Francis

There are many reasons to be hopeful about the direction of Catholic-Orthodox dialogue but it is threatened by tensions emerging within the Orthodox Church. As the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity gets under way today, a leading ecumenist gives his assessment.

In 1923, a schoolteacher priest of Lyons started devoting his spare time to helping the 10,000 refugees from Bolshevism camped and lodged around the city and its suburbs. It was his first encounter with a Christianity that was not Roman Catholic. Thus he learned the friendship of receiving as well as giving, finding great respect for the Orthodox clergy and people in their moment of destitution, as his heart opened to their faith and the beauty of their worship. He was astonished to find Catholics from the old Russian Empire who were not Latins, but Eastern Christians who maintained their unity with the Bishop of Rome with roots to before the Great Schism. Over the next decade, Paul Couturier became convinced of the need for Christian unity, and in 1935 he took hold of the Catholic Church Unity Octave, founded in 1908, and developed it into a “Universal Week of Prayer for the Unity of Christians in the charity and truth of Christ”. Inspired by the holiness of the Orthodox, beyond this world he imagined an “invisible monastery”, in which all could unite in prayer to God in Heaven, in the hope of seeing the same union realised in the Church here. He took for his motto the saying of Metropolitan Platon Gorodetsky of Kiev: “The walls of separation do not rise as far as Heaven.”
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Posted: Jan. 16, 2014 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=7184
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Bartholomew I, Catholic, ecumenism, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox
Transmis : 16 janv. 2014 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=7184
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Bartholomew I, Catholic, ecumenism, Moscow Patriarchate, Orthodox


Francis blesses Vatican cricket team

Cardinal Ravasi of the Pontifical Council for Culture presented the priests and seminarians of the St Peter's Cricket Club to Pope Francis on 9 September ahead of their Light of Faith Tour to England (12-20 September 2014), which culminates in a match against an Anglican, Church of England XI. Together with the cultural encounter experience of visiting London and Canterbury, they shall be praying at various holy shrines together with our ecumenical partners and raising funds for the Global Freedom Network, which fights against modern slavery and human trafficking

Pope Francis has given his blessing to the Vatican’s international cricket team as it prepares to take on the Church of England. The side of Catholic priests are preparing for their first tour to England, which will include a match with the Church of England XI in Canterbury. Pope Francis, who is a supporter of Buenos Aires football side San Lorenzo, put on a cricket cap and signed a bat that the team will take with them during their tour of England, which begins on Friday. After the tour the bat will be auctioned in order to raise money for a joint Catholic and Anglican campaign against modern-day slavery and indentured labour, the Global Freedom Network, the Vatican said. The papal XI will play matches against chaplains of the British armed forces at Aldershot and the Royal Household Cricket Club at Windsor Castle, as well as two other games. Then in Canterbury on September 19 the team will take on the Anglican XI.
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Posted: Sept. 10, 2014 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=7778
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Anglican, Church of England, ecumenism, Pope Francis, Vatican
Transmis : 10 sept. 2014 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=7778
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Anglican, Church of England, ecumenism, Pope Francis, Vatican


New Vatican magazine criticises Church for ‘ignoring role of women’

The cover of <em>L'Osservatore Romano</em> announcing the election of Pope Francis

The magazine, which launched today, started as a monthly section in the Vatican newspaper L’Osservatore Romano.

The Church has ignored the female contribution to Catholic culture in recent years, according to an editorial in a new women’s magazine published by the Vatican’s semi-official newspaper.

Lucetta Scaraffia, the co-ordinator of Women-Church-World, the new monthly magazine published by L’Osservatore Romano, said that a “hidden revolution” had taken place during the last century with women making an increasingly important contribution to the intellectual life of Catholicism.

But this, she explained, had been “almost ignored” by the Church even though it had intensified in the years following the Second Vatican Council when more and more women started to study theology.
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Posted: May 3, 2016 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=9062
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Vatican
Transmis : 3 mai 2016 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=9062
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Vatican


Are we on the brink of a new ecumenical spring?

Pope Francis greets Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby during a private audience at the Vatican

It is not uncommon to read optimistic appraisals of how the cause of Christian unity is progressing. There are in fact undeniable signs of continuing progress in relations between the divided churches as set out, for example, in the study document From Conflict to Communion, describing the substantial advance of relations between Catholics and Lutherans in fifty years of dialogue.

But not all is plain sailing. To the careful observer there are also signs of frustration and even retrenchment. To not a few, the traditional ways of doing ecumenism seem no longer capable of meeting new challenges coming from developments both within the Catholic Church and within the other Churches, our ecumenical partners.
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Posted: Jan. 24, 2019 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=10491
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Brian Farrell, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity
Transmis : 24 janv. 2019 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=10491
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Brian Farrell, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity


Patriarchs at war as Russian ‘cancels’ Alexandrian from prayers

Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia

The Patriarchate of Alexandria has become the latest to recognise Ukraine’s new independent Orthodox church, prompting angry reactions from Russian leaders who bitterly opposed its establishment by the Ecumenical Patriarchate a year ago.

In a brief statement during a Cairo service, Patriarch Theodore II of Alexandria and All-Africa said the recognition had been conferred after “many prayers and consultations” among his senior clergy. Meanwhile, in a second message to his bishops, published by Greece’s Orthodox Romfea news agency, Theodore confirmed the move, adding that it had followed “mature reflection” and many personal talks, and been taken out of “concern for peace and the Orthodox churches’ unity and wellbeing”.
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Posted: Nov. 11, 2019 • Permanent link: ecumenism.net/?p=10688
Categories: The TabletIn this article: Moscow Patriarchate, Ukraine, Ukrainian Orthodox
Transmis : 11 nov. 2019 • Lien permanente : ecumenism.net/?p=10688
Catégorie : The TabletDans cet article : Moscow Patriarchate, Ukraine, Ukrainian Orthodox