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Archive for 2020

Archive pour 2020

The Revd Dr Will Adam with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. Photo: Lambeth Palace

Unity, Faith and Order

 — February 7, 20207 février 2020

The Department for Unity, Faith and Order in the Anglican Communion has at its core the search for deeper unity between Christians, be that within and between the churches of the Anglican Communion or between the Anglican Communion and other Christian churches and bodies.

Much of the work of Unity, Faith and Order (which goes by the extra-terrestrial acronym UFO) is taken up with encouraging Christians to talk together. Over the course of the last century much work has been done to break down mutual suspicion and division between churches by patient dialogue and the building up of relationships. This happens at the local level, where Christians find that when they come together to pray or get involved with mission and ministry that they have more in common than they first thought. It also happens at national and international level, when theologians from different churches and traditions talk together to come to agreement on issues that have previously divided them.
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Posted: February 7, 2020 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=10720
Categories: ACNSIn this article: Anglican Communion, Christian unity, ecumenism
Transmis : 7 février 2020 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=10720
Catégorie : ACNSDans cet article : Anglican Communion, Christian unity, ecumenism

Protest participants at Unist'ot'en Camp honour missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as police move towards the camp. Photo: Michael Toledano

Church leaders sign statement of support for Wet’suwet’en

 — February 18, 202018 février 2020

A statement calling on the government of Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to “immediately cease their occupation, arrests, and trespassing on Wet’suwet’en sovereign territory” has drawn signatures from 71 church leaders in in the Anglican Church of Canada and beyond.

The statement of solidarity with Wet’suwet’en Nation pipeline opposition was released by Toronto Urban Native Ministry in the diocese of Toronto. Posted Feb. 6, it was signed by several Anglican bishops, including National Indigenous Anglican Archbishop Mark MacDonald and National Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada Susan Johnson. Many more signatures have since been added via the web.

The statement notes the unanimous opposition of the Wet’suwet’en Clan Chiefs to the construction of the pipeline. It says that the “militarized forced removal of the Wet’suwet’an from their own territory” is in violation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP) and is “consistent with the colonial practices of genocide,” and that the RCMP “does not hold the jurisdiction or right to arrest sovereign Wet’suwet’en peoples on their own unceded Nation and territory.”
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Posted: February 18, 2020 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=10715
Categories: Anglican JournalIn this article: Aboriginal reconciliation, Canada, Indigenous peoples
Transmis : 18 février 2020 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=10715
Catégorie : Anglican JournalDans cet article : Aboriginal reconciliation, Canada, Indigenous peoples