Archive for 2014

Archive pour 2014

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Lament for a Divided Church

Lament for a Divided ChurchEcumenism is the word that de­­scribes the historical movement for global church unity. I used to think of it as either a boring academic exercise in doctrinal compromise, or a winner-takes-all struggle to forge one monolithic superchurch.

After five years in the field (I work for a Lutheran ecumenical organization), I’m no longer dismissive. The quest for church unity is a wild, wondrous, and strange act of penitence for Christians’ often callous disregard of that little word one in John 17 and the Nicene Creed. We confess that the Holy Spirit has called one church into being. But almost all the evidence points in the opposite direction. What does this mean? And how should we respond to it?
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Posted: March 17, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7450
Categories: OpinionIn this article: Christian unity, schism
Transmis : 17 mars 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7450
Catégorie : OpinionDans cet article : Christian unity, schism


Truth and Relevance: Catholic Theology in French Quebec since the Quiet Revolution

Gregory Baum's latest book - Truth and Relevance: Catholic Theology in French Quebec since the Quiet RevolutionAfter the Quiet Revolution, the Catholic Church lost its stronghold in Quebec. Despite this decline, or perhaps because of it, contemporary Catholic thought in Quebec exhibits a bold creativity. In Truth and Relevance, Gregory Baum introduces, contextualizes, and interprets Catholic theological writing in Quebec since the 1960s, and presents this body of work for an anglophone readership.

Baum shows how Catholic theologians, inspired by the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), uncovered the social meaning in the Christian message, allowing them to address many problems and concerns of contemporary society. With reliance on the Gospel, they supported Quebec’s new self-understanding, embraced its nationalism under certain conditions, fostered social solidarity, criticized the unregulated market system, demanded gender equality, and called for respect of new religious and cultural pluralism. Leaving behind the Catholicism of Quebec’s past, these theologians embraced the humanistic values of modern society, recognizing their affinity with the Gospel, while at the same time revealing the destructive potential of modernity, its individualism, utilitarianism, relativism, and its link to empire and capitalism.
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Posted: March 26, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7456
Categories: ResourcesIn this article: books, Catholic, Québec, theology
Transmis : 26 mars 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7456
Catégorie : ResourcesDans cet article : books, Catholic, Québec, theology


Communiqué from the Malines Conversations Group

An international group of eight Anglican and eight Catholic theologians representing nine countries and four Anglican provinces, met from March 30 to April 3 in Canterbury. Called “The Malines Conversations Group,” participants continued their deliberations on various aspects of Anglican-Catholic liturgical and sacramental theology which they had begun last year at the Benedictine Monastery of Chevetogne in Belgium. Like the original Malines Conversations of the 1920s hosted by the then Archbishop of Malines-Bruxelles Cardinal Mercier, this is an informal dialogue and not officially sponsored by the Anglican and Catholic Churches, though it has been organized in consultation with and has received the blessing of both the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity and Lambeth Palace.
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Posted: April 4, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7473
Categories: CommuniquéIn this article: Anglican, Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism, Malines
Transmis : 4 avril 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7473
Catégorie : CommuniquéDans cet article : Anglican, Catholic, dialogue, ecumenism, Malines


Ecumenism must involve dialogue and social action, says Welby

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, and the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Toronto, Cardinal Thomas Collins, at an ecumenical reception in St. James Cathedral Centre. Welby visited the Anglican Church of Canada, April 7 to 8. Photo: Michael HudsonArchbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has underscored the value of continuing ecumenical dialogue at a “passionate theological level” while at the same time having “a closer relationship of action” that addresses the needs of the world in such areas as poverty and social justice. Ecumenism must be “something that is our burning desire,” Welby told a gathering of ecumenical guests at a reception at Toronto’s St. James’ Cathedral Centre, during his “personal, pastoral visit” to the Anglican Church of Canada April 8 to 9. “In the last seven verses of John: 17, Jesus prays with extraordinary passion and extraordinary directness about the absolute necessity of the visible unity of the church… Love one another…” In a divided and diverse world, Welby said the church could demonstrate “how humanity can overcome its cultural divisions and truly be… a holy nation of God’s people.” In different parts of the world, there has been “a new movement of the spirit,” said Welby. He cited a decision by Chemin Neuf, a Jesuit-founded French Catholic community with an ecumenical vocation, to accept his invitation to take up residence in Lambeth Palace. Last January, four members set up “a fraternity” in Lambeth Palace. “We hope that is something that will grow and develop,” said Welby, adding that he and his wife, Caroline, got to know the community over the last seven years. (The archbishop’s spiritual director is a Swiss Roman Catholic priest, Fr. Nicholas Buttet.) The Guardian newspaper has noted that the move breaks five centuries of Anglican tradition and ushers “a further rapprochement between the churches of England and Rome.”
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Posted: April 11, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7508
Categories: Anglican JournalIn this article: Anglican Church of Canada, dialogue, ecumenism, justice, Justin Welby, social policy
Transmis : 11 avril 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7508
Catégorie : Anglican JournalDans cet article : Anglican Church of Canada, dialogue, ecumenism, justice, Justin Welby, social policy


Reformed-Catholic Dialogue focuses on justice

Theologians from the World Communion of Reformed Churches (WCRC) and the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity (PCPCU) met together 6-12 April at Coatbridge, Scotland, for their fourth session in the fourth phase of the International Reformed-Catholic Dialogue.

The theme designated for this current phase of the dialogue, which is slated to conclude in 2017, is “Justification and Sacramentality: The Christian Community as an Agent for Justice.”

The two teams discussed several papers on topics related to the theme of justice. Marina Behara presented a paper titled “Sanctification: The middle term between justification and justice.” Jorge Scampini presented a paper on “The relationship between the Eucharist and justice from a Catholic perspective.” George Hunsinger addressed the topic “The Eucharist and social ethics.” Peter De Mey offered a paper on “Justification and the universal call to holiness.”
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Posted: April 16, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7520
Categories: CommuniquéIn this article: dialogue, ecumenism, justice, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, World Communion of Reformed Churches
Transmis : 16 avril 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7520
Catégorie : CommuniquéDans cet article : dialogue, ecumenism, justice, Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, World Communion of Reformed Churches


Baptisms mutually recognized in European and American churches

In an ecumenical harvest, a spate of European and North American church bodies are entering agreements recognizing each other’s baptisms. On the day after Easter, a day on which many Christian traditions receive catechumens through the rite of baptism, the Swiss churches (Roman Catholic, Reformed, Methodist, Old Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran) will sign an agreement on the mutual recognition of baptism. The signing ceremony, the culmination of an intense ecumenical interchange sponsored by the Council of Christian Churches in Switzerland, will take place in Riva San Vitale, Ticino, site of the oldest Christian building in Switzerland. Among the many divisive historical issues about baptism have been the essential elements of the rite and its sacramental character, the baptismal formula, the validity of infant baptisms, and the question of rebaptism.
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Posted: April 17, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7569
Categories: WCC NewsIn this article: Anglican, baptism, Europe, Orthodox, Protestant
Transmis : 17 avril 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7569
Catégorie : WCC NewsDans cet article : Anglican, baptism, Europe, Orthodox, Protestant


German ecumenical groups respond to a call for “pilgrimage of justice and peace”

A mural painted by a group of artists led by Anne Stickel at the Mainz ecumenical assembly in Germany, 2014More than 400 representatives of German ecumenical groups attending an assembly in Mainz, Germany have affirmed their commitment to move forward in a “pilgrimage of justice and peace” – a call from the World Council of Churches’ (WCC) Busan assembly. The ecumenical assembly in Mainz, held from 30 April to 4 May, addressed the theme “The future we desire – Life not destruction”. The event was organized by a network of ecumenical groups in Germany, encouraging actions from the churches inspired by the call for a “pilgrimage of justice and peace”. Featuring vibrant discussions on political, social, economic and ecological issues, as well as theological reflections, the Mainz assembly focused on themes such as “earth as our home”, ecumenical spirituality, economy of life, climate justice and “just peace”. The sessions at the assembly were attended by local visitors along with the registered participants. Some 151 workshops were organized at the assembly addressing a number of themes, including seminars on transformative spirituality.
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Posted: May 5, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7543
Categories: WCC NewsIn this article: ecumenism, WCC
Transmis : 5 mai 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7543
Catégorie : WCC NewsDans cet article : ecumenism, WCC


Greek Catholics in Ukraine restore former Mennonite church building

In Ukraine a former Mennonite church building is being restored and transformed - with the help of Canadian Mennonites - into a Greek Catholic churchIn Ukraine a former Mennonite church building is being restored and transformed – with the help of Canadian Mennonites – into a Greek Catholic church. This development, according to observers, is an example of Mennonite-Catholic collaboration in the spirit of other exchanges over the past decade or so. The Mennonite church in the former village of Schoensee (now Snegurovka) was originally built in 1909. During the post-October 1917 revolution Soviet era, when Mennonites were forced to leave, the church building was used for storage and then fell into disrepair. Recently the Greek Catholic Church in Ukraine secured ownership of the building and a retired Catholic priest from the Czech Republic, Father Peter Trenzky, is giving leadership to the restoration as well as to the congregation, which has started to worship in the building. In learning about the restoration project, individuals associated with the Mennonite Centre in nearby Molochansk (formerly Halbstad) offered to help. The Centre was established in 2001 in the former Mennonite Girls’ School (Maedchenschule) to provide a range of community services.
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Posted: May 5, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7581
Categories: NewsIn this article: Bridgefolk, Mennonite, Ukrainian Catholic
Transmis : 5 mai 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7581
Catégorie : NewsDans cet article : Bridgefolk, Mennonite, Ukrainian Catholic


Evangelicals and Catholics Together marks 20 years

Charles Colson, together with Father Richard John Neuhaus established Evangelicals and Catholics Together in 1994When evangelicals and Catholics set aside centuries of mutual suspicion 20 years ago, the idea was fairly simple: Even if we can’t always work together, at least let’s not work against each other. Now, two decades after the launch of the group Evangelicals and Catholics Together, relations between the two groups appear stronger than ever, forged by shared battles over abortion, same-sex marriage, religious freedom and immigration. A new pope is finding crossover appeal among evangelicals who share Pope Francis’ emphasis on evangelism and his distaste for the fancier trappings and authoritarianism of the papacy. “The first affirmation of Evangelicals and Catholics Together is that Jesus Christ is Lord, and there’s the source of our hope,” Catholic theologian Matthew Levering of Mundelein Seminary outside Chicago told the recent Q conference of evangelical movers and shakers in Nashville, Tenn. “This was an anchor for when they began to discover that we share the same gospel.”
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Posted: May 7, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7547
Categories: Evangelical-Roman Catholic Dialogue, RNSIn this article: Catholic, dialogue, Evangelicals, Evangelicals and Catholics Together
Transmis : 7 mai 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7547
Catégorie : Evangelical-Roman Catholic Dialogue, RNSDans cet article : Catholic, dialogue, Evangelicals, Evangelicals and Catholics Together


A recipe for Christian unity: flesh, blood, tea and whisky

Cardinal Gérald Cyprien Lacroix (left), Roman Catholic archbishop of Quebec and Bishop Dennis Drainville (right) of the Anglican Diocese of Quebec embrace before the cross. Photo: Daniel AbelMy grandmother and my great-grandmother, both Quebecers, both died on Good Friday. They were Protestant anglophones in a majority Catholic francophone world. In my grandmother’s day, Catholics would cross the street to avoid passing in front of a Protestant church for fear of damnation. As for my great-grandmother, who lived in La Baie on the Saguenay, her Catholic maid was famously heard to say what a kind person my great-grandmother was, and what a pity she was going to hell.

I hope all of them, including the maid, can see what their descendants were doing this Good Friday in Quebec. Four different Christian denominations in Quebec City got together to walk with a huge cross through the streets. In total silence we walked from church to church, United Church, Anglican, Presbyterian, and Catholic, stopping in each one to pray and sing and read some more of the Passion story.

It was a warm evening, and people stopped on the street to stare. Teenagers giggled together with embarrassment, militant atheists muttered with contempt, old women smiled happily. Some quietly joined us, mostly immigrants from countries where people still go to church. Would-be anthropologists took pictures of us, with our Catholic cardinal in red and our white-robed Anglican bishop, to put on their Facebook pages, the way they might post pictures of Amazonian tribes: “Didn’t know there were any left! Didn’t even have to take malaria pills to see this!”
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Posted: May 8, 2014 • Permanent link: ecu.net/?p=7549
Categories: OpinionIn this article: Anglican, Catholic, Québec, spiritual ecumenism
Transmis : 8 mai 2014 • Lien permanente : ecu.net/?p=7549
Catégorie : OpinionDans cet article : Anglican, Catholic, Québec, spiritual ecumenism


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